Unix/ls

From Rosetta Code
Task
Unix/ls
You are encouraged to solve this task according to the task description, using any language you may know.
Task

Write a program that will list everything in the current folder,   similar to:

  •   the Unix utility   “ls”   [1]       or
  •   the Windows terminal command   “DIR


The output must be sorted, but printing extended details and producing multi-column output is not required.


Example output

For the list of paths:

/foo/bar
/foo/bar/1
/foo/bar/2
/foo/bar/a
/foo/bar/b


When the program is executed in   `/foo`,   it should print:

bar

and when the program is executed in   `/foo/bar`,   it should print:

1
2
a
b



8th[edit]

 
"*" f:glob
' s:cmp a:sort
"\n" a:join .
 

Ada[edit]

with Ada.Text_IO, Ada.Directories, Ada.Containers.Indefinite_Vectors; 
 
procedure Directory_List is
 
use Ada.Directories, Ada.Text_IO;
Search: Search_Type; Found: Directory_Entry_Type;
package SV is new Ada.Containers.Indefinite_Vectors(Natural, String);
Result: SV.Vector;
package Sorting is new SV.Generic_Sorting; use Sorting;
function SName return String is (Simple_Name(Found));
 
begin
-- search directory and store it in Result, a vector of strings
Start_Search(Search, Directory => ".", Pattern =>"");
while More_Entries(Search) loop
Get_Next_Entry(Search, Found);
declare
Name: String := Simple_Name(Found);
begin
if Name(Name'First) /= '.' then
Result.Append(Name);
end if; -- ingnore filenames beginning with "."
end;
end loop; -- Result holds the entire directory in arbitrary order
 
Sort(Result); -- Result holds the directory in proper order
 
-- print Result
for I in Result.First_Index .. Result.Last_Index loop
Put_Line(Result.Element(I));
end loop;
end Directory_List;

AWK[edit]

Works with: gawk
"BEGINFILE" is a gawk-extension
 
# syntax: GAWK -f UNIX_LS.AWK * | SORT
BEGINFILE {
printf("%s\n",FILENAME)
nextfile
}
END {
exit(0)
}
 

Sample commands and output under Windows 8:

REM create folders and files
MKDIR c:\foo\bar
CD /D c:\foo\bar
GAWK "BEGIN{x=\"12ab\";for(i=1;i<=length(x);i++){print(i)>substr(x,i,1)}}"
REM run test
CD /D c:\foo
GAWK -f UNIX_LS.AWK * | SORT
bar
CD /D c:\foo\bar
GAWK -f UNIX_LS.AWK * | SORT
1
2
a
b
Works with: gawk

To replicate 'ls .'

gawk -lreaddir 'BEGIN { FS = "/" } {print $2}' .
Works with: gawk

To replicate 'ls examplefile.txt'

gawk -lfilefuncs -lreaddir 'BEGIN { FS = "/"; stat(ARGV[1], fd); if(fd["type"] == "file") {print ARGV[1]; exit} } { print $2}' examplefile.txt

BaCon[edit]

' Emulate ls
cnt% = 0
files$ = ""
OPEN CURDIR$ FOR DIRECTORY AS mydir
GETFILE myfile$ FROM mydir
WHILE ISTRUE(LEN(myfile$))
IF LEFT$(myfile$, 1) != "." THEN
INCR cnt%
files$ = APPEND$(files$, cnt%, UNFLATTEN$(myfile$))
ENDIF
GETFILE myfile$ FROM mydir
WEND
CLOSE DIRECTORY mydir
IF cnt% > 0 THEN
FOR f$ IN SORT$(files$)
PRINT FLATTEN$(f$)
NEXT
ENDIF

C[edit]

C does not have any os-independent way of reading a directory. The following uses readdir and should work on any Unix system.

 
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <unistd.h>
 
int cmpstr(const void *a, const void *b)
{
return strcmp(*(const char**)a, *(const char**)b);
}
 
int main(void)
{
DIR *basedir;
char path[PATH_MAX];
struct dirent *entry;
char **dirnames;
int diralloc = 128;
int dirsize = 0;
 
if (!(dirnames = malloc(diralloc * sizeof(char*)))) {
perror("malloc error:");
return 1;
}
 
if (!getcwd(path, PATH_MAX)) {
perror("getcwd error:");
return 1;
}
 
if (!(basedir = opendir(path))) {
perror("opendir error:");
return 1;
}
 
while ((entry = readdir(basedir))) {
if (dirsize >= diralloc) {
diralloc *= 2;
if (!(dirnames = realloc(dirnames, diralloc * sizeof(char*)))) {
perror("realloc error:");
return 1;
}
}
dirnames[dirsize++] = strdup(entry->d_name);
}
 
qsort(dirnames, dirsize, sizeof(char*), cmpstr);
 
int i;
for (i = 0; i < dirsize; ++i) {
if (dirnames[i][0] != '.') {
printf("%s\n", dirnames[i]);
}
}
 
for (i = 0; i < dirsize; ++i)
free(dirnames[i]);
free(dirnames);
closedir(basedir);
return 0;
}
 

C++[edit]

Library: Boost
 
#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <boost/filesystem.hpp>
 
namespace fs = boost::filesystem;
 
int main(void)
{
fs::path p(fs::current_path());
std::set<std::string> tree;
 
for (auto it = fs::directory_iterator(p); it != fs::directory_iterator(); ++it)
tree.insert(it->path().filename().native());
 
for (auto entry : tree)
std::cout << entry << '\n';
}
 

C#[edit]

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
 
namespace Unix_ls
{
public class UnixLS
{
public static void Main(string[] args)
{
UnixLS ls = new UnixLS();
ls.list(args.Length.Equals(0) ? "." : args[0]);
}
 
private void list(string folder)
{
foreach (FileSystemInfo fileSystemInfo in new DirectoryInfo(folder).EnumerateFileSystemInfos("*", SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly))
{
Console.WriteLine(fileSystemInfo.Name);
}
}
}
}

Clojure[edit]

(def files (sort (filter #(= "." (.getParent %)) (file-seq (clojure.java.io/file ".")))))
 
(doseq [n files] (println (.getName n)))

Common Lisp[edit]

In some implementations, `(directory)` results automatically include subdirectories (e.g. SBCL); some require them to be requested separately (e.g. CLISP). The function below asks for both and then removes any duplicates from the resulting list.

The workhorse is `files-list`, which returns a list of filenames. The `ls` function sorts the resulting list and formats it for output.

(defun files-list (&optional (path "."))
(let* ((dir (concatenate 'string path "/"))
(abs-path (car (directory dir)))
(file-pattern (concatenate 'string dir "*"))
(subdir-pattern (concatenate 'string file-pattern "/")))
(remove-duplicates
(mapcar (lambda (p) (enough-namestring p abs-path))
(mapcan #'directory (list file-pattern subdir-pattern)))
:test #'string-equal)))
 
(defun ls (&optional (path "."))
(format t "~{~a~%~}" (sort (files-list path) #'string-lessp)))

D[edit]

void main() {
import std.stdio, std.file, std.path;
 
foreach (const string path; dirEntries(getcwd, SpanMode.shallow))
path.baseName.writeln;
}

EchoLisp[edit]

No directory in EchoLisp, which is run in a browser window. Instead, "stores" (folders) and keys in stores (file names) are located in local storage.

 
;; ls of stores (kind of folders)
(for-each writeln (list-sort < (local-stores)))
AGES
NEMESIS
info
objects.dat
reader
system
user
words
 
;; ls of "NEMESIS" store
(for-each writeln (local-keys "NEMESIS"))
Alan
Glory
Jonah
 

Elixir[edit]

iex(1)> ls = fn dir -> File.ls!(dir) |> Enum.each(&IO.puts &1) end
#Function<6.54118792/1 in :erl_eval.expr/5>
iex(2)> ls.("foo")
bar
:ok
iex(3)> ls.("foo/bar")
1
2
a
b
:ok

F#[edit]

Works with .NET framework 4.

let ls = DirectoryInfo(".").EnumerateFileSystemInfos() |> Seq.map (fun i -> i.Name) |> Seq.sort |> Seq.iter (printfn "%s")

Prior to .NET4 you had to enumerate files and directories separately.

The call to sort is probably redundant, since "sorted by name" seems to be the default in Windows.

Forth[edit]

This is much easier without the 'sorted output' requirement:

256 buffer: filename-buf
: each-filename { xt -- } \ xt-consuming variant
s" ." open-dir throw { d }
begin filename-buf 256 d read-dir throw while
filename-buf swap xt execute
repeat d close-dir throw ;
 
\ immediate variant
: each-filename[ s" ." postpone sliteral ]] open-dir throw >r begin filename-buf 256 r@ read-dir throw while filename-buf swap [[ ; immediate compile-only
: ]each-filename ]] repeat drop r> close-dir throw [[ ; immediate compile-only
 
: ls ( -- ) [: cr type ;] each-filename ;

Given that requirement, we must first generate a sorted array of filenames:

: save-string ( c-addr u -- a )
dup 1+ allocate throw dup >r place r> ;
 
require ffl/car.fs
: sorted-filenames ( -- car )
0 car-new { a }
[: swap count rot count compare ;] a car-compare!
each-filename[ save-string a car-insert-sorted ]each-filename
a ;
 
: each-sorted-filename ( xt -- )
sorted-filenames { a } a car-execute [: free throw ;] a car-execute a car-free ;
 
: ls ( -- )
[: count cr type ;] each-sorted-filename ;
 

Fortran[edit]

This is possible only for those Fortran compilers that offer some sort of interface with the operating system's file handling routines. Not standard at all!
      PROGRAM LS		!Names the files in the current directory.
USE DFLIB !Mysterious library.
TYPE(FILE$INFO) INFO !With mysterious content.
NAMELIST /HIC/INFO !This enables annotated output.
INTEGER MARK,L !Assistants.
 
MARK = FILE$FIRST !Starting state.
Call for the next file.
10 L = GETFILEINFOQQ("*",INFO,MARK) !Mystery routine returns the length of the file name.
IF (MARK.EQ.FILE$ERROR) THEN !Or possibly, not.
WRITE (6,*) "Error!",L !Something went wrong.
WRITE (6,HIC) !Reveal INFO, annotated.
STOP "That wasn't nice." !Quite.
ELSE IF (IAND(INFO.PERMIT,FILE$DIR) .EQ. 0) THEN !Not a directory.
IF (L.GT.0) WRITE (6,*) INFO.NAME(1:L) !The object of the exercise!
END IF !So much for that entry.
IF (MARK.NE.FILE$LAST) GO TO 10 !Lastness is discovered after the last file is fingered.
END !If FILE$LAST is not reached, "system resources may be lost."
This relies on the supplied routine GETFILEINFOQQ, which is not at all a standard routine, but it does behave in the same way as is found in many other systems, notably with a file name selection filter, here chosen to be "*" meaning "any file". It supplies successive file names and requires mysterious parameters to keep track of what it is doing. In the installation file C:/Compilers/Furrytran/Compaq Furrytran 6.6a CD/X86/DF/INCLUDE/DFLIB.F90, there is the following segment:
      INTERFACE
INTEGER*4 FUNCTION GETFILEINFOQQ(FILES, BUFFER,dwHANDLE)
!DEC$ ATTRIBUTES DEFAULT :: GETFILEINFOQQ
CHARACTER*(*) FILES
STRUCTURE / FILE$INFO /
INTEGER*4 CREATION ! Creation time (-1 on FAT)
INTEGER*4 LASTWRITE ! Last write to file
INTEGER*4 LASTACCESS ! Last access (-1 on FAT)
INTEGER*4 LENGTH ! Length of file
INTEGER*2 PERMIT ! File access mode
CHARACTER*255 NAME ! File name
END STRUCTURE
RECORD / FILE$INFO / BUFFER
INTEGER*4 dwHANDLE
END FUNCTION
END INTERFACE

Getting this to work was quite annoying. It turned out that the irritating "files" . and .. are deemed a directory (via the bit in INFO.PERMIT matching that of FILE$DIR = 16) and so can be skipped along with proper subdirectories, but the "PERMIT" value of -1 returned for the FILE$LAST state also matches, though its (non-existent) file name length is given as zero. Thus, if one skips directories filter-style by IF ... GO TO 10, in such a case the end will never be seen. Further, although Fortran syntax allows INFO.PERMIT .AND. FILE$DIR the bit values of logical variables are strange. Instead, what is needed is IAND(INFO.PERMIT,FILE$DIR)

Further vexation was due to the compiler's "help" system giving PERMIT as a 32-bit integer in its example. Copying the declaration to give a type name not involving a dollar symbol foundered because the type checking done by the compiler for the parameters of the function is based not on the contents of the type matching, but on the name of the type matching. So, one is stuck with the $. In a mood for retaliation, some special tests were made, involving a pause for input after each name was revealed. Removing the file just named before responding to the request for input did not prevent the next file from being named, nor (in another run) did removing the file next to be named: although it was gone, it was still named in the next step as if it were still there, and this worked even if INFO.NAME were scrubbed each time as well. Evidently, there could arise transient problems when using this scheme in a file system undergoing turbulence.

As for the ordering of results, on this Windows XP system, the file names came out ordered so there is no need to mess about with a storage area to sort the names in.

FunL[edit]

import io.File
 
for f <- sort( list(File( "." ).list()).filterNot(s -> s.startsWith(".")) )
println( f )
Output:

The above script has been placed in a file called ls.lf which has been placed in the home directory.

$ sudo mkdir -p /foo/bar
$ cd /foo/bar
$ sudo touch 1 2 a b
$ cd ..
$ funl ~/ls
bar
$ cd bar
$ funl ~/ls
1
2
a
b
$ 

Gambas[edit]

Public Sub Main()
Dim sDir As String[] = Dir(User.Home &/ "test").Sort()
 
Print sDir.Join(gb.NewLine)
 
End

Output:

a.txt
b.txt
c.txt
d.txt
e.txt

Go[edit]

package main
 
import (
"fmt"
"log"
"os"
"sort"
)
 
func main() {
f, err := os.Open(".")
if err != nil {
log.Fatal(err)
}
files, err := f.Readdirnames(0)
f.Close()
if err != nil {
log.Fatal(err)
}
sort.Strings(files)
for _, n := range files {
fmt.Println(n)
}
}

Haskell[edit]

Works with: GHC version 7.8.3
import Control.Monad
import Data.List
import System.Directory
 
dontStartWith = flip $ (/=) . head
 
main = do
files <- getDirectoryContents "."
mapM_ putStrLn $ sort $ filter (dontStartWith '.') files

J[edit]

See the dir.ijs script for a full description of the interface for dir:

   dir ''       NB. includes properties
>1 1 dir '' NB. plain filename as per task

Java[edit]

Works with: Java version 8
 
package rosetta;
 
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.nio.file.DirectoryStream;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Path;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
 
public class UnixLS {
 
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
UnixLS ls = new UnixLS();
ls.list(System.out);
}
 
private void list(PrintStream out) throws IOException {
try (DirectoryStream<Path> stream = Files.newDirectoryStream(Paths.get("."))) {
stream.forEach((path) -> out.println(path.getFileName()));
}
}
}
 
 

JavaScript[edit]

Works with: Node.js version 4.3.2+
const fs = require('fs');
fs.readdir('.', (err, names) => names.sort().map( name => console.log(name) ));

LiveCode[edit]

set the defaultFolder to "/foo"
put the folders & the files
set the defaultFolder to "/foo/bar"
put the folders & the files

Lua[edit]

Using LuaFileSystem - available in LuaRocks, ULua, major Linux distro repos, etc, etc.

require("lfs")
for file in lfs.dir(".") do print(file) end

Mathematica[edit]

Column[FileNames[]]

Nim[edit]

 
import os
 
for kind, path in walkDir(getCurrentDir(), true):
echo path
 

OCaml[edit]

let () =
Array.iter print_endline (
Sys.readdir Sys.argv.(1) )
Output:
$ cd /foo/bar
$ ocaml ls.ml
1
2
a
b

PARI/GP[edit]

GP doesn't have this capability so we can either use the shell or PARI. For the latter see C; for the former:

system("dir/b/on")

in DOS/Windows or

system("ls")

in *nix.

Pascal[edit]

This is the example in the Turbo Pascal 4 manual. With Turbo Pascal and old-style DOS file names, all file names come out in capitals, further, names not fitting into the "8.3" style (of up to eight characters followed by an extension of up to three characters) are presented with ad-hoc names fitting that style, so for example, Tab2Comma.exe comes out as TAB2CO~1.EXE. The same source file compiles unchanged via the Free Pascal compiler, whereupon long file names appear with capitals and lower-case letters rather than all-capitals.

When tested via Windows XP, the names came out in sorted order (ignoring case) however in earlier systems the files would be presented in entry order. That is, if files a, c, b were saved, they would be named in that order. Then, if file c were deleted and then a file named x were added, they would be named in the order a, x, b. In this case, a scheme for saving an unknown number of names (of unknown length) would be needed so that they could be sorted. Perhaps some linked-list with an insertionsort for each added name...

 
Program ls; {To list the names of all files/directories in the current directory.}
Uses DOS;
var DirInfo: SearchRec; {Predefined. See page 403 of the Turbo Pascal 4 manual.}
BEGIN
FindFirst('*.*',AnyFile,DirInfo); {AnyFile means any file name OR directory name.}
While DOSerror = 0 do {Result of FindFirst/Next not being a function, damnit.}
begin
WriteLn(DirInfo.Name);
FindNext(DirInfo);
end;
END.
 

Perl[edit]

opendir my $handle, '.' or die "Couldnt open current directory: $!";
while (readdir $handle) {
print "$_\n";
}
closedir $handle;

Alternatively, using glob:

print "$_\n" for glob '*';
print "$_\n" for glob '* .*';  # If you want to include dot files

Perl 6[edit]

There is a dir builtin command which returns a list of IO::Path objects. We stringify them all with a hyperoperator before sorting the strings.

.say for sort ~«dir

Phix[edit]

pp(dir("."),{pp_Nest,1})
Output:
{{".", "d", 0,2017,4,3,21,0,7},
 {"..", "d", 0,2017,4,3,21,0,7},
 {".hg", "d", 0,2017,3,27,13,53'5',38'&'},
 {".hgignore", "a", 15330,2017,3,27,13,29,21},
 {"alice_oz.txt", "a", 336926,2017,3,15,19,12,24},
 {"asm", "d", 0,2017,4,2,20,33'!',39'''},
...etc

PHP[edit]

This will output all the filenames in the current directory.

 
<?php
foreach(scandir('.') as $fileName){
echo $fileName."\n";
}
 

PicoLisp[edit]

(for F (sort (dir))
(prinl F) )

Python[edit]

>>> import os
>>> print('\n'.join(sorted(os.listdir('.'))))
DLLs
Doc
LICENSE.txt
Lib
NEWS.txt
README.txt
Scripts
Tools
include
libs
python.exe
pythonw.exe
tcl
>>>

Racket[edit]

Ooh... warning... if you run the test module (either with DrRacket with the test module automatically running, or with raco test ls.rkt, then the example directory tree is built but not torn down.

#lang racket/base
 
;; Racket's `directory-list' produces a sorted list of files
(define (ls) (for-each displayln (directory-list)))
 
;; Code to run when this file is running directly
(module+ main
(ls))
 
(module+ test
(require tests/eli-tester racket/port racket/file)
(define (make-directory-tree)
(make-directory* "foo/bar")
(for ([f '("1" "2" "a" "b")])
(with-output-to-file (format "foo/bar/~a"f) #:exists 'replace newline)))
(make-directory-tree)
(define (ls/str dir)
(parameterize ([current-directory dir]) (with-output-to-string ls)))
(test (ls/str "foo") => "bar\n"
(ls/str "foo/bar") => "1\n2\na\nb\n"))

Both tests pass.

REXX[edit]

The following program works under Windows and used the Windows DIR command to list a bare-bones sorted list.

/*REXX program lists contents of current folder  (ala mode UNIX's  LS). */
'DIR /b /oN' /*use Windows DIR: sorts & lists.*/
/*stick a fork in it, we're done.*/

Notes on the options used for the DIR command:

  •   b   is for bare format (no heading information or summary).
  •   o   is for order, and it orders (sorts) by file Name.

Ruby[edit]

 
Dir.foreach("./"){|n| puts n}
 

This will output all files including hidden ones e.g. '.' and '..'.

Run BASIC[edit]

files #f, DefaultDir$ + "\*.*" 	' RunBasic Default directory.. Can be any directroy
print "rowcount: ";#f ROWCOUNT() ' how many rows in directory
#f DATEFORMAT("mm/dd/yy") 'set format of file date or not
#f TIMEFORMAT("hh:mm:ss") 'set format of file time or not
count = #f rowcount()
for i = 1 to count ' loop thru the row count
print "info: ";#f nextfile$() ' file info
print "name: ";#f NAME$() ' Name of file
print "size: ";#f SIZE() ' size
print "date: ";#f DATE$() ' date
print "time: ";#f TIME$() ' time
print "isdir: ";#f ISDIR() ' 1 = is a directory
next

This will output RunBasics Default Directory.. It can be any directory

rowcount: 30
info: antiGram1.bas,1743,08/02/16,08:34:50,
name: antiGram1.bas
size: 1743
date: 08/02/16
time: 08:34:50
isdir: 0
info: avionics.db,0,05/09/16,09:02:01,
name: avionics.db
size: 0
date: 05/09/16
time: 09:02:01
isdir: 0
...

Rust[edit]

use std::{env, fmt, fs, process};
use std::io::{self, Write};
use std::path::Path;
 
fn main() {
let cur = env::current_dir().unwrap_or_else(|e| exit_err(e, 1));
let arg = env::args().nth(1);
print_files(arg.as_ref().map_or(cur.as_path(), |p| Path::new(p)))
.unwrap_or_else(|e| exit_err(e, 2));
}
 
#[inline]
fn print_files(path: &Path) -> io::Result<()> {
for x in try!(fs::read_dir(path)) {
println!("{}", try!(x).file_name().to_string_lossy());
}
Ok(())
}
 
#[inline]
fn exit_err<T>(msg: T, code: i32) -> ! where T: fmt::Display {
writeln!(&mut io::stderr(), "{}", msg).expect("Could not write to stderr");
process::exit(code)
}
Output:
$ mkdir -p foo/bar
$ ./unix_ls
foo
unix_ls
$ cd foo/bar
$ touch a b 1 2
$ cd ../..
$ ./unix_ls foo
bar
$ ./unix_ls foo/bar
1
2
a
b


S-lang[edit]

variable d = listdir(getcwd()), p;
foreach p (array_sort(d))
() = printf("%s\n", d[p] );

Scala[edit]

Output:
scala> new java.io.File("/").listFiles.sorted.foreach(println)
/bin
/boot
/core
/dev
/etc
/home
/lib
/lib64
/local
/lost+found
/media
/mnt
/opt
/proc
/root
/run
/sbin
/selinux
/srv
/sys
/tmp
/user
/usr
/var 

Sidef[edit]

Explicit, by opening the current working directory:

var content = [];
Dir.cwd.open.each { |file|
file ~~ < . .. > && next;
content.append(file);
}
 
content.sort.each { |file|
say file;
}

Implicit, by using the String.glob method:

'*'.glob.each { |file|
say file;
}

Stata[edit]

Stata has a builtin dir command (or equivalently ls).

. dir *.dta
6.3k 6/12/17 14:26 auto.dta
2.3k 8/10/17 7:34 titanium.dta
6.0k 8/12/17 9:28 trend.dta

Tcl[edit]

puts [join [lsort [glob -nocomplain *]] "\n"]

Ursa[edit]

decl file f
decl string<> fnames
set fnames (sort (f.listdir "."))
 
for (decl int i) (< i (size fnames)) (inc i)
out fnames<i> endl console
end for

zkl[edit]

File.glob("*").sort()

Lists all files and directories in the current directory. If you only want a list of files:

File.glob("*",0x8).sort()
Output:
L("README","superball","testThemAll.log","zkl.exe","zkl_tests.zip","zkl_vm_src.zip")

The glob method uses Unix shell wild cards.

The globular method recurses down through the directories. It can send results to objects, functions, methods, threads, etc, etc. To get a sorted list of all the directories under the "Src" directory:

File.globular("Src",*,True,0x10,List).sort().concat("\n")
Output:
Src/Compiler/
Src/Misc/
Src/Test/
Src/Time/
Src/Utils/
Src/ZenKinetic/
Src/ZenKinetic/Frame_O_Matic/
Src/ZenKinetic/GBalls/
Src/ZenKinetic/Twist and Draw/
Src/ZenKinetic/ZEd