Test a function

From Rosetta Code
Task
Test a function
You are encouraged to solve this task according to the task description, using any language you may know.


Task

Using a well-known testing-specific library/module/suite for your language, write some tests for your language's entry in Palindrome.

If your language does not have a testing specific library well known to the language's community then state this or omit the language.

ACL2

Using DoubleCheck:

(defun reverse-split-at-r (xs i ys)
  (if (zp i)
      (mv xs ys)
      (reverse-split-at-r (rest xs) (1- i)
                          (cons (first xs) ys))))

(defun reverse-split-at (xs i)
  (reverse-split-at-r xs i nil))

(defun is-palindrome (str)
  (let* ((lngth (length str))
         (idx (floor lngth 2)))
    (mv-let (xs ys)
            (reverse-split-at (coerce str 'list) idx)
            (if (= (mod lngth 2) 1)
                (equal (rest xs) ys)
                (equal xs ys)))))

(include-book "testing" :dir :teachpacks)

(check-expect (is-palindrome "abba") t)
(check-expect (is-palindrome "mom") t)
(check-expect (is-palindrome "dennis sinned") t)
(check-expect (is-palindrome "palindrome") nil)
(check-expect (is-palindrome "racecars") nil)

(include-book "doublecheck" :dir :teachpacks)

(defrandom random-palindrome ()
  (let ((chars (random-list-of (random-char))))
    (coerce (append chars (reverse chars))
            'string)))

(defproperty palindrome-test
  (p :value (random-palindrome))
  (is-palindrome p))

Ada

For normal use there is pragma Assert, functioning the same as many other languages.
For larger testing frameworks, there are packages like Aunit or Trendy Test

with Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Test_Function is

   function Palindrome (Text : String) return Boolean is
   begin
      for Offset in 0 .. Text'Length / 2 - 1 loop
         if Text (Text'First + Offset) /= Text (Text'Last - Offset) then
            return False;
         end if;
      end loop;
      return True;
   end Palindrome;

   str1 : String := "racecar";
   str2 : String := "wombat";

begin
   begin
      pragma Assert(False); -- raises an exception if assertions are switched on
      Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line("Skipping the test! Please compile with assertions switched on!"); 
   exception
      when others => -- assertions are switched on -- perform the tests
         pragma Assert (Palindrome (str1) = True,  "Assertion on str1 failed");
         pragma Assert (Palindrome (str2) = False, "Assertion on str2 failed");
         Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line("Test Passed!");
   end;
end Test_Function;

Ada 2012 introduced a new way to specify functions and test their correctness: Pre- and Postoconditions.

   function Palindrome (Text : String) return Boolean 
     with Post => Palindrome'Result = 
     (Text'Length < 2 or else 
    ((Text(Text'First) = Text(Text'Last)) and then 
       Palindrome(Text(Text'First+1 .. Text'Last-1))));

Arturo

palindrome?: function [s][
    s = reverse s
]

tests: [
    [true? palindrome? "aba"]
    [false? palindrome? "ab" ]
]

loop tests => ensure
Output:

AutoHotkey

there is no "well known" testing library, but here is a simple testing framework:
test library: assert.ahk

; assert.ahk
;; assert(a, b, test=2)
assert(a, b="blank", test=0)
{
  if (b = "blank")
{
    if !a
      msgbox % "blank value"
      return 0
}
    if equal_list(a, b, "`n")
      return 0
    else
    msgbox % test . ":`n" . a . "`nexpected:`n" . b
}
  
!r::reload

;; equal_list(a, b, delimiter)
equal_list(a, b, delimiter)
{
  loop, parse, b, %delimiter%
  {
    if instr(a, A_LoopField)
      continue
    else
      return 0
  }
  loop, parse, a, %delimiter%
  {
    if instr(b, A_LoopField)
      continue
    else
      return 0
  }

  return 1
}

test example:

assert(isPalindrome("in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni"), 1
, "palindrome test")
assert(broken("in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni"), "works"
, "broken test")  
/*
output: 
---------------------------
testPalindrome.ahk
---------------------------
broken test:
broken
expected:
works
*/

broken(x){
return "broken"
}

#Include assert.ahk
#Include palindrome.ahk

Brat

include :assert

palindrome? = { str | 
  str = str.downcase.sub /\s+/ ""
  str == str.reverse 
}

setup name: "palindrome test" {
  test "is a palindrome" {
    assert { palindrome? "abba" }
  }

  test "is not a palindrome" {
    assert_false { palindrome? "abb" }
  }

  test "is not a string" {
    assert_fail { palindrome? 1001 }
  }

  test "this test fails" {
    assert { palindrome? "blah blah" }
  }
}

Output:

Loading tests...
Running palindrome test...
(4/4) this test fails                         
Test failure(s):

        1. 'this test fails': assert failed

4 tests, 4 assertions, 1 failures.

C

#include <assert.h>
int IsPalindrome(char *Str);

int main()
{
    assert(IsPalindrome("racecar"));
    assert(IsPalindrome("alice"));
}

C#

First, using the VisualStudio TestTools for unit tests. I'm testing both of the methods for palindrome detection created in the article.

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using PalindromeDetector.ConsoleApp;

namespace PalindromeDetector.VisualStudioTests
{
    [TestClass]
    public class VSTests
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void PalindromeDetectorCanUnderstandPalindrome()
        {
            //Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework v4.0.30319
            bool expected = true;
            bool actual;
            actual = Program.IsPalindrome("1");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindromeNonRecursive("1");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindrome("ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindromeNonRecursive("ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
        }
        [TestMethod]
        public void PalindromeDetecotryCanUnderstandNonPalindrome()
        {
            bool notExpected = true;
            bool actual = Program.IsPalindrome("ThisIsNotAPalindrome");
            Assert.AreNotEqual(notExpected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindromeNonRecursive("ThisIsNotAPalindrome");
            Assert.AreNotEqual(notExpected, actual);
        }
    }
}

Second, NUnit tests. Couldn't test these because of namespace issues with NUnit, but I'm sure they work.

using NUnit.Framework;
using PalindromeDetector.ConsoleApp;

namespace PalindromeDetector.VisualStudioTests
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class NunitTests
    {
        [Test]
        public void PalindromeDetectorCanUnderstandPalindrome()
        {
            //nunit.framework v2.0.50727
            bool expected = true;
            bool actual;
            actual = Program.IsPalindrome("1");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindromeNonRecursive("1");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindrome("ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindromeNonRecursive("ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni");
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
        }
        [Test]
        public void PalindromeDetectorUnderstandsNonPalindrome()
        {
            bool notExpected = true;
            bool actual;
            actual = Program.IsPalindrome("NotAPalindrome");
            Assert.AreEqual(notExpected, actual);
            actual = Program.IsPalindromeNonRecursive("NotAPalindrome");
            Assert.AreEqual(notExpected, actual);
        }
    }
}

C++

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>

constexpr bool is_palindrome(std::string_view s)
{
  return std::equal(s.begin(), s.begin()+s.length()/2, s.rbegin());
}


C++ has several popular frameworks for testing. However, simple things like a palidrome test can be tested at compile time - failing the test will cause a compilation failure.

void CompileTimeTests()
{
  static_assert(is_palindrome("ada"));
  static_assert(!is_palindrome("C++"));

  static_assert(is_palindrome("C++"));  // fails at compile time
  static_assert(!is_palindrome("ada")); // fails at compile time
}

int main()
{
}
Output:
/home/garbanzo/play/rosettascratch/test-a-function_constexpr.cpp: In function 'void CompileTimeTests()':
/home/garbanzo/play/rosettascratch/test-a-function_constexpr.cpp:18:30: error: static assertion failed
   18 |   static_assert(is_palindrome("C++"));  // fails at compile time
      |                 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~^~~~~~~
/home/garbanzo/play/rosettascratch/test-a-function_constexpr.cpp:19:17: error: static assertion failed
   19 |   static_assert(!is_palindrome("ada")); // fails at compile time
      |                 ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
gmake[2]: *** [CMakeFiles/scratch.dir/build.make:286: CMakeFiles/scratch.dir/test-a-function_constexpr.cpp.o] Error 1
gmake[1]: *** [CMakeFiles/Makefile2:83: CMakeFiles/scratch.dir/all] Error 2
gmake: *** [Makefile:136: all] Error 2


A popular testing framework is gtest.

#include <gtest/gtest.h>

TEST(PalindromeSuite, Test1)
{
  EXPECT_TRUE(is_palindrome("ada"));
  EXPECT_FALSE(is_palindrome("C++"));

  EXPECT_FALSE(is_palindrome("ada")); // will fail
  EXPECT_TRUE(is_palindrome("C++"));  // will fail
}
Output:
Running main() from /var/tmp/portage/dev-cpp/gtest-1.11.0/work/googletest-release-1.11.0/googletest/src/gtest_main.cc
[==========] Running 1 test from 1 test suite.
[----------] Global test environment set-up.
[----------] 1 test from PalindromeSuite
[ RUN      ] PalindromeSuite.Test1
/home/garbanzo/play/rosettascratch/test-a-function_gtest.cpp:16: Failure
Value of: is_palindrome("ada")
  Actual: true
Expected: false
/home/garbanzo/play/rosettascratch/test-a-function_gtest.cpp:17: Failure
Value of: is_palindrome("C++")
  Actual: false
Expected: true
[  FAILED  ] PalindromeSuite.Test1 (0 ms)
[----------] 1 test from PalindromeSuite (0 ms total)

[----------] Global test environment tear-down
[==========] 1 test from 1 test suite ran. (0 ms total)
[  PASSED  ] 0 tests.
[  FAILED  ] 1 test, listed below:
[  FAILED  ] PalindromeSuite.Test1

 1 FAILED TEST


Boost also has a testing framework.

#define BOOST_TEST_MAIN
#include <boost/test/unit_test.hpp>

BOOST_AUTO_TEST_CASE( Test1 )
{
    BOOST_CHECK( is_palindrome("ada") == true );
    BOOST_CHECK( is_palindrome("C++") == false );

    BOOST_CHECK( is_palindrome("ada") == false); // will fail
    BOOST_CHECK( is_palindrome("C++") == true);  // will fail    
}
Output:
Running 1 test case...
[path]/test-a-function_boost.cpp(20): error: in "Test1": check is_palindrome("ada") == false has failed
[path]/test-a-function_boost.cpp(21): error: in "Test1": check is_palindrome("C++") == true has failed

*** 2 failures are detected in the test module "Master Test Suite"

Clojure

(use 'clojure.test)

(deftest test-palindrome?
  (is (palindrome? "amanaplanacanalpanama"))
  (is (not (palindrome? "Test 1, 2, 3")))

(run-tests)

Common Lisp

(defpackage :rosetta
  (:use :cl
        :fiveam))
(in-package :rosetta)

(defun palindromep (string)
  (string= string (reverse string)))

;; A suite of tests are declared with DEF-SUITE
(def-suite palindrome-suite :description "Tests for PALINDROMEP")

;; Tests following IN-SUITE are in the defined suite of tests
(in-suite palindrome-suite)

;; Tests are declared with TEST and take an optional documentation
;; string
(test palindromep
  "Basic unit tests for PALINDROMEP."
  (is-true (palindromep "a"))
  (is-true (palindromep ""))
  (is-true (palindromep "aba"))
  (is-true (palindromep "ahha"))
  (is-true (palindromep "amanaplanacanalpanama"))
  (is-false (palindromep "ab"))
  (is-false (palindromep "abcab")))

(test palindromep-bad-tests
  "In order to demonstrate a failing test"
  (is-true (palindromep "ab")))

;; Property based tests are also possible using built-in generators
(test matches-even-length-palindromes
  (for-all ((s (gen-string)))
    (is-true (palindromep (concatenate 'string s (reverse s))))))

;; And counter examples can be found for failing tests. This also
;; demonstrates combining generators to create cleaner input, in this
;; case restricting characters to the range of ASCII characters and
;; only permitting alphanumeric values.
(test matches-even-length-palindromes-bad
  (for-all ((s (gen-string :elements (gen-character :code (gen-integer :min 0 :max 127) :alphanumericp t))))
    (is-true (palindromep (concatenate 'string s s)))))

#|
Tests can be executed using RUN, RUN!, and (EXPLAIN! result-list)

RUN! = (EXPLAIN! (RUN test))

Individual tests can be run or the entire suite:

ROSETTA> (run! 'palindrome-suite)

Running test suite PALINDROME-SUITE
 Running test PALINDROMEP .......
 Running test PALINDROMEP-BAD-TESTS f
 Running test MATCHES-EVEN-LENGTH-PALINDROMES .....................................................................................................
 Running test MATCHES-EVEN-LENGTH-PALINDROMES-BAD ff
 Did 10 checks.
    Pass: 8 (80%)
    Skip: 0 ( 0%)
    Fail: 2 (20%)

 Failure Details:
 --------------------------------
 MATCHES-EVEN-LENGTH-PALINDROMES-BAD []: 
      Falsifiable with ("oMYhcqnVbjYgxT6d3").
 Results collected with failure data:
    Did 1 check.
       Pass: 0 ( 0%)
       Skip: 0 ( 0%)
       Fail: 1 (100%)

    Failure Details:
    --------------------------------
    MATCHES-EVEN-LENGTH-PALINDROMES-BAD []: 
         (PALINDROMEP (CONCATENATE 'STRING S S)) did not return a true value.
    --------------------------------

 --------------------------------
 --------------------------------
 PALINDROMEP-BAD-TESTS [In order to demonstrate a failing test]: 
      (PALINDROMEP "ab") did not return a true value.
 --------------------------------

NIL
(#<IT.BESE.FIVEAM::TEST-FAILURE {10083B52A3}>
 #<IT.BESE.FIVEAM::FOR-ALL-TEST-FAILED {1008B34963}>)
NIL
ROSETTA> (run! 'palindromep)

Running test PALINDROMEP .......
 Did 7 checks.
    Pass: 7 (100%)
    Skip: 0 ( 0%)
    Fail: 0 ( 0%)

T
NIL
NIL
|#

Crystal

require "spec"

describe "palindrome" do
  it "returns true for a word that's palindromic" do
    palindrome("racecar").should be_true
  end

  it "returns false for a word that's not palindromic" do
    palindrome("goodbye").should be_false
  end
end

def palindrome(s)
  s == s.reverse
end
Finished in 179 microseconds
2 examples, 0 failures, 0 errors, 0 pending

D

unittest {
  assert(isPalindrome("racecar"));
  assert(isPalindrome("bob"));
  assert(!isPalindrome("alice"));
}

Delphi

Using built in assertions.

  Assert(IsPalindrome('salàlas'), 'salàlas is a valid palindrome');
  Assert(IsPalindrome('Ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni'), 'Ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni is a valid palindrome');
  Assert(not IsPalindrome('123'), '123 is not a valid palindrome');

Using DUnit, an open source unit testing framework that is bundled with Delphi.

  Check(IsPalindrome('salàlas'), 'salàlas is a valid palindrome');
  Check(IsPalindrome('Ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni'), 'Ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni is a valid palindrome');
  Check(not IsPalindrome('123'), '123 is not a valid palindrome');

E

Translation of: Python

The standard testing tool in E is Updoc, a system which takes test scripts formatted in the same style as a REPL session and verifies that executing them produces the specified result values.

#!/usr/bin/env rune

? def isPalindrome(string :String) {
>   def upper := string.toUpperCase()
>   def last := upper.size() - 1
>   for i => c ? (upper[last - i] != c) in upper(0, upper.size() // 2) { 
>     return false
>   }
>   return true
> }

? isPalindrome("")
# value: true

? isPalindrome("a")
# value: true

? isPalindrome("aa")
# value: true

? isPalindrome("baa")
# value: false

? isPalindrome("baab")
# value: true

? isPalindrome("ba_ab")
# value: true

? isPalindrome("ba_ ab")
# value: false

? isPalindrome("ba _ ab")
# value: true

? isPalindrome("ab"*2)
# value: false

? def x := "ab" * 2**15; null

? x.size()
# value: 65536

? def xreversed := "ba" * 2**15; null

? isPalindrome(x + xreversed)
# value: true

? (x + xreversed).size()
# value: 131072

EchoLisp

EchoLisp provides (assert <true-value?> ["fail-message"]) and (check-expect <expression> <expected-result>).

(assert (palindrome? "aba"))  #t
(assert (palindrome? "abbbca") "palindrome fail")
💥 error: palindrome fail : assertion failed : (palindrome? abbbca)

(check-expect (palindrome? "aba") #t)  #t
(check-expect (palindrome? "abcda") #f)  #t
(check-expect (palindrome? "abcda") #t)
😐 warning: #t : check failed : (palindrome? abcda)  #f
(assert (palindrome? "un roc lamina l animal cornu"))  #t

Erlang

This is a unit test so I use Eunit. For system tests "Common Test" would be used. Both are built in.

-module( palindrome_tests ).
-compile( export_all ).
-include_lib( "eunit/include/eunit.hrl" ).

abcba_test() -> ?assert( palindrome:is_palindrome("abcba") ).

abcdef_test() -> ?assertNot( palindrome:is_palindrome("abcdef") ).
Output:
25> eunit:test(palindrome).
  All 2 tests passed.

Euphoria

--unittest in standard library 4.0+
include std/unittest.e
include palendrome.e  --routines to be tested

object p = "12321"

test_equal("12321", 1, isPalindrome(p))
test_equal("r12321", 1, isPalindrome(reverse(p)))

test_report()

F#

Library: NUnit
let palindrome (s : string) =
    let a = s.ToUpper().ToCharArray()
    Array.rev a = a
 
 
open NUnit.Framework

[<TestFixture>]
type TestCases() =
    [<Test>]
    member x.Test01() =
        Assert.IsTrue(palindrome "radar")
 
    [<Test>]
    member x.Test02() =
        Assert.IsFalse(palindrome "hello")

Factor

By convention, if there is a vocabulary at x/x.factor, then its tests belong in x/x-tests.factor.

palindrome/palindrome.factor

USING: kernel sequences ;
IN: palindrome

: palindrome? ( string -- ? ) dup reverse = ;

palindrome/palindrome-tests.factor

USING: palindrome tools.test ;
IN: palindrome.tests

[ t ] [ "racecar" palindrome? ] unit-test
[ f ] [ "ferrari" palindrome? ] unit-test

To run these tests from the listener:

( scratchpad ) "palindrome" test

Factor's tutorial, Your first program, uses palindrome? as its example. The tutorial shows how to create tests for palindrome? and how to fix a failing test.

Fantom

To use the built-in test library, the program must be compiled into a pod. The layout for a simple pod and its build file is given in the documentation, and also information for adding and running the test files.

class TestPalindrome : Test
{
  public Void testIsPalindrome ()
  {
    verify(Palindrome.isPalindrome(""))
    verify(Palindrome.isPalindrome("a"))
    verify(Palindrome.isPalindrome("aa"))
    verify(Palindrome.isPalindrome("aba"))
    verifyFalse(Palindrome.isPalindrome("abb"))
    verify(Palindrome.isPalindrome("salàlas"))
    verify(Palindrome.isPalindrome("In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni".lower.replace(" ","")))
  }
}

Fortran

There is no standard or popular facility. Compilers usually do not even check that a function or subroutine is invoked with the correct number of parameters let alone the correct types. Testing that a function returns expected values is entirely a matter for the programmer and whatever tools that may be devised, either directly for the function in question or adapted from some other project where this had been done.


FreeBASIC

Translation of: VBA
Sub StrReverse(Byref text As String)
    Dim As Integer x, lt = Len(text)
    For x = 0 To lt Shr 1 - 1
        Swap text[x], text[lt - x - 1]
    Next x
    
End Sub

Sub Replace(Byref T As String, Byref I As String, Byref S As String, Byval A As Integer = 1)
    Var p = Instr(A, T, I), li = Len(I), ls = Len(S) : If li = ls Then li = 0
    Do While p
        If li Then T = Left(T, p - 1) & S & Mid(T, p + li) Else Mid(T, p) = S
        p = Instr(p + ls, T, I)
    Loop
End Sub

Function IsPalindrome(Byval txt As String) As Boolean
    Dim As String tempTxt = Lcase(txt), copyTxt = Lcase(txt)
    Replace(tempTxt, " ", "")
    Replace(copyTxt, " ", "")
    
    StrReverse(tempTxt)
    If tempTxt = copyTxt Then 
        Color 10
        Return true 
    Else 
        Color 12
        Return false
    End If
End Function

'--- Programa Principal ---
Dim As String a(10) => {"abba", "mom", "dennis sinned", "Un roc lamina l animal cornu", _
"palindrome", "ba _ ab", "racecars", "racecar", "wombat", "in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni"}

Print !"¨Pal¡ndromos?\n"
For i As Byte = 0 To Ubound(a)-1
    Print a(i) & " -> ";
    Print IsPalindrome((a(i)))
    Color 7
Next i
Sleep
Output:
¿Palíndromos?

abba -> true
mom -> true
dennis sinned -> true
Un roc lamina l animal cornu -> true
palindrome -> false
ba _ ab -> true
racecars -> false
racecar -> true
wombat -> false
in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni -> true


Go

Using Go's standard command, go test.

package pal

import "testing"

func TestPals(t *testing.T) {
    pals := []string{
        "",
        ".",
        "11",
        "ere",
        "ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni",
    }
    for _, s := range pals {
        if !IsPal(s) {
            t.Error("IsPal returned false on palindrome,", s)
        }
    }
}

func TestNonPals(t *testing.T) {
    nps := []string{
        "no",
        "odd",
        "salàlas",
    }
    for _, s := range nps {
        if IsPal(s) {
            t.Error("IsPal returned true on non-palindrome,", s)
        }
    }
}

Output of go test:

PASS
ok      pal     0.002s

Haskell

A notable testing library for Haskell is QuickCheck. It works in a way particularly supported by Haskell's type inference: you provide a function return a boolean, the test, and QuickCheck automatically generates random values for the function's parameters and checks that it returns True for all of them.

import Test.QuickCheck

isPalindrome :: String -> Bool
isPalindrome x = x == reverse x

{- There is no built-in definition of how to generate random characters;
   here we just specify ASCII characters. Generating strings then automatically
   follows from the definition of String as list of Char. -}
instance Arbitrary Char where
  arbitrary = choose ('\32', '\127')

--                                            /------------------------- the randomly-generated parameters
--                                            |      /------------------ the constraint on the test values
--                                            |      |                /- the condition which should be true
--                                            v      v                v
main = do 
  putStr "Even palindromes: " >> quickCheck (\s   ->                  isPalindrome (s ++ reverse s))
  putStr "Odd palindromes:  " >> quickCheck (\s   -> not (null s) ==> isPalindrome (s ++ (tail.reverse) s))
  putStr "Non-palindromes:  " >> quickCheck (\i s -> not (null s) && 0 <= i && i < length s && i*2 /= length s
                                                                  ==> not (isPalindrome (take i s ++ "•" ++ drop i s)))

The ==> operator is used to constrain the randomly-generated values: the second test needs a nonempty string, and the third needs an index into the string that is not the exact middle.

Icon and Unicon

The fact that success and failure of expression evaluation is an integral part of both languages means that one may want to test expressions for success or for failure. There is no standard framework, but the following example shows how these tests might be handled.

procedure main()
    s := "ablewasiereisawelba"
    assert{"test1",palindrome(s)}
    assertFailure{"test2",palindrome(s)}
    s := "un"||s
    assert{"test3",palindrome(s)}
    assertFailure{"test4",palindrome(s)}
end

procedure palindrome(s)
    return s == reverse(s)
end

procedure assert(A)
    if not @A[2] then write(@A[1],": failed")
end

procedure assertFailure(A)
    if @A[2] then write(@A[1],": failed")
end

Which outputs:

->testf
test2: failed
test3: failed
->

Insitux

It is possible to mock any built-in or user-defined function, and assert values are truthy. Testing Insitux's Palindrome detection entry.

(var palindrome? (comp (filter letter?) lower-case (= (reverse %))))

;Arrange
(var calls [])
(function record f
  (fn (var! calls (append f))
      (... (unmocked f) args)))

(mock comp       (record comp)
      filter     (record filter)
      letter?    (record letter?)
      lower-case (record lower-case)
      =          (record =)
      reverse    (record reverse))

(var sentence "In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.")

;Act
(var result (palindrome? sentence))

(unmock comp filter letter? lower-case = reverse)

;Assert
(assert result)

(var occurred (freqs calls))
(assert (= (len sentence) (occurred letter?)))                  ;letter? is called (len sentence) times
(assert (... = 1 (map occurred [filter lower-case reverse =]))) ;other functions are called only once

J

Using the general/unittest Addon to test the isPalin0 verb from Palindrome.

Tests are contained in a test script c:\mypath\palindrome_test.ijs with the following contents:

NB. Contents of palindrome_test.ijs

NB. Basic testing
test_palinA=: monad define
  assert isPalin0 'abcba'
  assert isPalin0 'aa'
  assert isPalin0 ''
  assert -. isPalin0 'ab'
  assert -. isPalin0 'abcdba'
)

NB. Can test for expected failure instead
palinB_expect=: 'assertion failure'
test_palinB=: monad define
  assert isPalin0 'ab'
)

Example Usage:

   require 'general/unittest'
   unittest 'c:\mypath\palindrome_test.ijs'
Test: c:\mypath\palindrome_test.ijs
palinA .................................. OK
palinB .................................. OK

Java

Works with: Java version 5

Library: JUnit
import static ExampleClass.pali; // or from wherever it is defined
import static ExampleClass.rPali; // or from wherever it is defined
import org.junit.*;
public class PalindromeTest extends junit.framework.TestCase {
    @Before
    public void setUp(){
        //runs before each test
        //set up instance variables, network connections, etc. needed for all tests
    }
    @After
    public void tearDown(){
        //runs after each test
        //clean up instance variables (close files, network connections, etc.).
    }

    /**
     * Test the pali(...) method.
     */
    @Test
    public void testNonrecursivePali() throws Exception {
        assertTrue(pali("abcba"));
        assertTrue(pali("aa"));
        assertTrue(pali("a"));
        assertTrue(pali(""));
        assertFalse(pali("ab"));
        assertFalse(pali("abcdba"));
    }
    /**
     * Test the rPali(...) method.
     */
    @Test
    public void testRecursivePali() throws Exception {
        assertTrue(rPali("abcba"));
        assertTrue(rPali("aa"));
        assertTrue(rPali("a"));
        assertTrue(rPali(""));
        assertFalse(rPali("ab"));
        assertFalse(rPali("abcdba"));
    }

    /**
     * Expect a WhateverExcpetion
     */
    @Test(expected=WhateverException.class)
    public void except(){
        //some code that should throw a WhateverException
    }
}

Most IDEs that support Java will have JUnit built in or will have an easy-to-use plugin for it. For those that don't use these IDEs, test classes can be run from a normal main method and their results will print to standard output:

public class RunTests{
  public static main(String[] args){
    org.junit.runner.JUnitCore.runClasses(PalindromeTest.class/*, other classes here if you have more*/);
  }
}

JavaScript

ES6

Library: Mocha
Works with: Node.js
Works with: Browserify
const assert = require('assert');

describe('palindrome', () => {
  const pali = require('../lib/palindrome');

  describe('.check()', () => {
    it('should return true on encountering a palindrome', () => {
      assert.ok(pali.check('racecar'));
      assert.ok(pali.check('abcba'));
      assert.ok(pali.check('aa'));
      assert.ok(pali.check('a'));
    });

    it('should return true on encountering an empty string', () => {
      assert.ok(pali.check(''));
    });

    it('should return false on encountering a non-palindrome', () => {
      assert.ok(!pali.check('alice'));
      assert.ok(!pali.check('ab'));
      assert.ok(!pali.check('abcdba'));
    });
  })
});

Output:

$ ls -R
.:
lib/  test/

./lib:
palindrome.js

./test:
test.js
$ mocha --harmony

  palindrome
    .check()
      ✓ should return true on encountering a palindrome
      ✓ should return true on encountering an empty string
      ✓ should return false on encountering a non-palindrome


  3 passing (18ms)

$ 

jq

The jq command has an option (--run-tests) for running functional tests.

Each test case is presented on STDIN in the form of a triplet of adjacent lines as follows:

  1. a jq expression on one line (possibly including a trailing comment)
  2. input on one line
  3. expected output in "compressed" form (one or more lines)

Comment-lines (lines beginning with #) and blank lines may be inserted between triplets.

A test case can include jq function definitions, but each test case is executed in isolation.

Here is an example of a file with four test case triplets:

# Test case 1:
.
1
1

# Test case 2:
1+1
null
2

# Test case 3 (with the wrong result):
1+1
null
0

# A test case with a function definition:
def factorial: if . <= 0 then 1 else . * ((. - 1) | factorial) end; factorial
3
6

If the file is named, say, test.txt, then the tests can be run by executing: jq --run-tests < test.txt

jq 1.4 produces very verbose output because an execution trace is included. In this article, only the key output lines are shown. The output that results from running the four test cases above is, in abbreviated form, as follows:

$ jq --run-tests < jq.tests

Testing '.' at line number 3
Testing '1+1' at line number 8
Testing '1+1' at line number 13
*** Expected 0, but got 2 for test at line number 15: 1+1
Testing 'def factorial: if . <= 0 then 1 else . * ((. - 1) | factorial) end; factorial' at line number 18
3 of 4 tests passed (0 malformed)

Testing jq Libraries

For tests of jq libraries, the "import" command can be used if your jq supports it. (The import command is not available in jq 1.4.)

For example, suppose the file library.jq contains the following definitions:

def factorial: if . <= 0 then 1 else . * ((. - 1) | factorial) end;

def palindrome: explode as $in | ($in|reverse) == $in;

and that the file test-library.txt contains the two test triplets:

import "library" as lib; lib::factorial
3
6

import "library" as lib; lib::palindrome
"salàlas"
true

Then the tests can be run by invoking jq in the usual way:

jq --run-tests < test-library.txt

Jsish

Jsi includes unit testing in the implementation of jsish. Jsi encourages unit testing.

Given the Palindrome detection solution of

/* Palindrome detection, in Jsish */
function isPalindrome(str:string, exact:boolean=true) {
  if (!exact) {
      str = str.toLowerCase().replace(/[^a-z0-9]/g, '');
  }
  return str === str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

jsish allows adding echo mode lines, (which are lines with a semi-colon ; in column 1 followed by an expression, with a closing semi-colon)

For example:

;isPalindrome('BUB');
;isPalidrome('CUB');

These lines are echoed in a special format of expression ==> result when turned up.

prompt$ jsish --U palindrome.jsi
isPalindrome('BUB') ==> true
isPalindrome('CUB') ==> false

Ok, looks good so far. jsish also has a run unit tests mode, -u. Along with running basic "did the program crash", -u also handles special comment sections for expectations.

/* Palindrome detection, in Jsish */
function isPalindrome(str:string, exact:boolean=true) {
  if (!exact) {
      str = str.toLowerCase().replace(/[^a-z0-9]/g, '');
  }
  return str === str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

;isPalindrome('BUB');
;isPalindrome('CUB');

/*
=!EXPECTSTART!=
isPalindrome('BUB') ==> true
isPalindrome('CUB') ==> false
=!EXPECTEND!=
*/

Giving

prompt$ jsish -u palindrome.jsi
[PASS] palindrome.jsi

Tests pass. The echo lines are captured, compared, and on failure will show a diff fragment.

Changing the expectation of CUB to true, gives

prompt$ jsish palindrome.jsi
[FAIL] palindrome.jsi
at line 2 of output:
        output: <isPalindrome('CUB') ==> false>
        expect: <isPalindrome('CUB') ==> true>
====================DIFFSTART
 isPalindrome('BUB') ==> true
-isPalindrome('CUB') ==> true
+isPalindrome('CUB') ==> false

====================DIFFEND

CUB is not an exact palindrome. Putting that back to pass again, and adding a few other tests, in particular for exercising the exact palindrome flag that ignores case and punctuation when set to false. (A false palindrome so to speak).

/* Palindrome detection, in Jsish */
function isPalindrome(str:string, exact:boolean=true) {
  if (!exact) {
      str = str.toLowerCase().replace(/[^a-z0-9]/g, '');
  }
  return str === str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

;isPalindrome('BUB');
;isPalindrome('CUB');
;isPalindrome('Bub');
;isPalindrome('Bub', false);
;isPalindrome('Never odd or even', false);
;isPalindrome('In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni', false);
;isPalindrome('A man, a plan, a canal; Panama!', false);
;isPalindrome('A man, a plan, a canal; Panama!', true);

/*
=!EXPECTSTART!=
isPalindrome('BUB') ==> true
isPalindrome('CUB') ==> false
=!EXPECTEND!=
*/

That's all good, but after looking at --U output, it'll mean an extra edit to the file to add the expectations. jsish to the rescue, and automatically updating the expectation block:

prompt$ jsish -u -update true palindrom.jsi
Updated palindrome.jsi

Which now looks like

/* Palindrome detection, in Jsish */
function isPalindrome(str:string, exact:boolean=true) {
  if (!exact) {
      str = str.toLowerCase().replace(/[^a-z0-9]/g, '');
  }
  return str === str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

;isPalindrome('BUB');
;isPalindrome('CUB');
;isPalindrome('Bub');
;isPalindrome('Bub', false);
;isPalindrome('Never odd or even', false);
;isPalindrome('In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni', false);
;isPalindrome('A man, a plan, a canal; Panama!', false);
;isPalindrome('A man, a plan, a canal; Panama!', true);

/*
=!EXPECTSTART!=
isPalindrome('BUB') ==> true
isPalindrome('CUB') ==> false
isPalindrome('Bub') ==> false
isPalindrome('Bub', false) ==> true
isPalindrome('Never odd or even', false) ==> true
isPalindrome('In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni', false) ==> true
isPalindrome('A man, a plan, a canal; Panama!', false) ==> true
isPalindrome('A man, a plan, a canal; Panama!', true) ==> false
=!EXPECTEND!=
*/

Easy peasy. Maybe too easy, auto update of unit tests should not be run until you know you have valid tests and known results. If there is a bug in the expression, -u -update true will gladly update a script with invalid results. The -update true feature should be treated as a helper, not a "turn off brain now" crutch. Very handy on initial create, or when messaging changes in code under test, but to be treated with respect and care.

Echo lines are not the only thing captured by jsish -u mode. All outputs are captured and can be compared in the EXPECT block. It even allows for sample input testing.

/* Interaction testing */
var trial = console.input();
puts(trial.replace(/a/g, 'b'));

/*
=!INPUTSTART!=
abccba
=!INPUTEND!=
*/

/*
=!EXPECTSTART!=
bbccbb
=!EXPECTEND!=
*/
Output:
prompt$ jsish -u test-inputs.jsi
[PASS] test-inputs.jsi

prompt$ jsish test-inputs.jsi
abc from user
bbc from user

When in unit testing, no user input was required, the console.input() method was fed data from the INPUTSTART block. When not in unit testing mode, code just runs as expected, and data was accepted from the keyboard.

You can ship jsish scripts with tests in and they will be ignored during normal operation. If that seems appropriate for purpose and not a max-speed production deployment.

There is more support for unit testing in Jsi. assert(expression) is ignored by default, and turned on during test mode for instance. Entire directories can be evaluated in test mode, by naming a directory instead of a filename.

See https://jsish.org/doc/Testing.html for more details.

Julia

Works with: Julia version 0.6
using Base.Test
include("Palindrome_detection.jl")

# Simple test
@test palindrome("abcdcba")
@test !palindrome("abd")

# Test sets
@testset "palindromes" begin
    @test palindrome("aaaaa")
    @test palindrome("abcba")
    @test palindrome("1")
    @test palindrome("12321")
end

@testset "non-palindromes" begin
    @test !palindrome("abc")
    @test !palindrome("a11")
    @test !palindrome("012")
end
Output:
Test Summary: | Pass  Total
palindromes   |    4      4
Test Summary:   | Pass  Total
non-palindromes |    3      3

Kotlin

Kotlin can use various JVM testing frameworks including its own kotlin-test module. However, for simple cases, it is easier to use the 'assert' function built into its standard library which will throw an AssertionError if the condition is false and assertions are enabled using java's -ea option when the application is run:

// version 1.1.3

fun isPalindrome(s: String) = (s == s.reversed())

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    val testCases = listOf("racecar", "alice", "eertree", "david")
    for (testCase in testCases) {
        try {
            assert(isPalindrome(testCase)) { "$testCase is not a palindrome" }
        }
        catch (ae: AssertionError) {
            println(ae.message)
        }
    }
}
Output:
alice is not a palindrome
david is not a palindrome

Lasso

The following example uses the LSpec Library:

// Taken from the Lasso entry in Palindrome page
define isPalindrome(text::string) => {
 
    local(_text = string(#text)) // need to make copy to get rid of reference issues
 
    #_text -> replace(regexp(`(?:$|\W)+`), -ignorecase)
 
    local(reversed = string(#_text))
    #reversed -> reverse
 
    return #_text == #reversed
}

// The tests
describe(::isPalindrome) => {
    it(`throws an error when not passed a string`) => {
        expect->error =>{
            isPalindrome(43)
        }
    }

    it(`returns true if the string is the same forward and backwords`) => {
        expect(isPalindrome('abba'))
    }

    it(`returns false if the string is different forward and backwords`) => {
        expect(not isPalindrome('aab'))
    }

    it(`ignores spaces and punctuation`) => {
        expect(isPalindrome(`Madam, I'm Adam`))
    }
}

// Run the tests and get the summary
// (This normally isn't in the code as the test suite is run via command-line.)
lspec->stop
Output:
....

Finished in 0.157030 seconds
4 tests, 0 failures

Lua

assert( ispalindrome("ABCBA") )
assert( ispalindrome("ABCDE") )

Mathematica/Wolfram Language

myFun[x_] := Block[{y},y = x^2; Assert[y > 5]; Sin[y]]
On[Assert];myFun[1.0]
Output:
Assert::asrtf: Assertion y>5 failed.
0.841471

NetRexx

Library: JUnit
/* NetRexx */

options replace format comments java crossref savelog symbols binary

import junit.framework.TestCase
import RCPalindrome

class RCTestAFunction public final extends TestCase

method setUp public
  return

method tearDown public
  return

method testIsPal public signals AssertionError

  assertTrue(RCPalindrome.isPal(Rexx 'abcba'))
  assertTrue(RCPalindrome.isPal(Rexx 'aa'))
  assertTrue(RCPalindrome.isPal(Rexx 'a'))
  assertTrue(RCPalindrome.isPal(Rexx ''))
  assertFalse(RCPalindrome.isPal(Rexx 'ab'))
  assertFalse(RCPalindrome.isPal(Rexx 'abcdba'))

  return

method except signals RuntimeException
  signal RuntimeException()

method main(args = String[]) public constant

  testResult = org.junit.runner.JUnitCore.runClasses([RCTestAFunction.class])
 
  secs = Rexx testResult.getRunTime / 1000.0

  if testResult.wasSuccessful then say 'Tests successful'
                              else say 'Tests failed'
  say '  failure count:' testResult.getFailureCount
  say '   ignore count:' testResult.getIgnoreCount
  say '      run count:' testResult.getRunCount
  say '       run time:' secs.format(null, 3)

  return
Output
Tests successful
  failure count: 0
   ignore count: 0
      run count: 1
       run time: 0.015

Nim

Using assertions (no output means all tests were correct; this only works with debug builds!):

proc reversed(s: string): string =
  result = newString(s.len)
  for i, c in s:
    result[s.high - i] = c

proc isPalindrome(s: string): bool =
  s == reversed(s)

when isMainModule:
  assert(isPalindrome(""))
  assert(isPalindrome("a"))
  assert(isPalindrome("aa"))
  assert(not isPalindrome("baa"))
  assert(isPalindrome("baab"))
  assert(isPalindrome("ba_ab"))
  assert(not isPalindrome("ba_ ab"))
  assert(isPalindrome("ba _ ab"))
  assert(not isPalindrome("abab"))

Using the “unittest” module:

import unittest

proc reversed(s: string): string =
  result = newString(s.len)
  for i, c in s:
    result[s.high - i] = c

proc isPalindrome(s: string): bool =
  s == reversed(s)

when isMainModule:
  suite "palindrome":
    test "empty string":
      check isPalindrome ""

    test "string of length 1":
      check isPalindrome "a"

    test "string of length 2":
      check isPalindrome "aa"

    test "string of length 3":
      check isPalindrome "aaa"

    test "no palindrome":
      check isPalindrome("foo") == false
Output:
[OK] empty string

[OK] string of length 1

[OK] string of length 2

[OK] string of length 3

[OK] no palindrome

OCaml

Using the library OUnit.

The module Palindrome is where are compiled the two functions is_palindrome and rem_space from this page. We put these two functions in a file named palindrome.ml and compile it with ocamlc -c palindrome.ml -o palindrome.cmo, then with the code below in the file palindrome_tests.ml we execute the tests with this command line:

ocaml unix.cma -I +oUnit oUnit.cma  palindrome.cmo  palindrome_tests.ml
open OUnit
open Palindrome

let test_palindrome_1 _ =
  assert_equal true (is_palindrome "aba")

let test_palindrome_2 _ =
  assert_equal true (is_palindrome "abba")

let test_palindrome_3 _ =
  assert_equal true (is_palindrome "abacidAdicaba")

let test_palindrome_4 _ =
  assert_equal false (is_palindrome "xREty5kgPMO")

let test_palindrome_5 _ =
  assert_equal true (is_palindrome(rem_space "in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni"))


let suite = "Test Palindrome" >::: ["test_palindrome_1" >:: test_palindrome_1;
                                    "test_palindrome_2" >:: test_palindrome_2;
                                    "test_palindrome_3" >:: test_palindrome_3;
                                    "test_palindrome_4" >:: test_palindrome_4;
                                    "test_palindrome_5" >:: test_palindrome_5]
let _ =
  run_test_tt_main suite

Odin

// To run execute: odin test Test_a_function.odin -file
package main

import "core:testing"
import "core:strings"

is_palindrome :: proc(s: string) -> bool {
  return s == strings.reverse(s)
}

@(test)
test_is_palindrome :: proc(t: ^testing.T) {
  palindromes := []string{"", "a", "aa", "aba", "racecar"}
  for i in palindromes {
    if !is_palindrome(i) {
      testing.errorf(t, "is_palindrome returned false on palindrome %s", i)
    }
  }

  non_palindromes := []string{"ab", "abaa", "aaba", "abcdba"}
  for i in non_palindromes {
    if is_palindrome(i) {
      testing.errorf(t, "is_palindrome returned true on non-palindrome %s", i)
    }
  }
}

Oforth

Unit tests are a built-in functionality. If Oforth is run using --t option, all tests are checked. Otherwise, tests are not checked :

test: [ "abcd" isPalindrome ]
test: ["abba" isPalindrome ]
test: [ "abcba" isPalindrome ]

PARI/GP

PARI/GP comes with a testing framework for gp. Testing the palindrome function (if converted with gp2c and added to PARI) would consist of adding lines like

? ispal("abc")
0
? ispal("aba")
1

Pascal

See Delphi

Perl

A test file, with a .t suffix, is just a Perl program that prints a test stream in Test Anything Protocol (TAP). There are modules to help print things in the correct TAP format; Perl 5 bundles Test, Test::Simple and Test::More.

This example uses Test and requires the Palindrome.pm file from Palindrome detection#Perl.

Translation of: Raku
# ptest.t
use strict;
use warnings;

use Test;

my %tests;
BEGIN {
    # plan tests before loading Palindrome.pm
    %tests = (
        'A man, a plan, a canal: Panama.'           => 1,
        'My dog has fleas'                          => 0,
        "Madam, I'm Adam."                          => 1,
        '1 on 1'                                    => 0,
        'In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni'    => 1,
        ''                                          => 1,
    );

    # plan 4 tests per string
    plan tests => (keys(%tests) * 4);
}

use Palindrome;

for my $key (keys %tests) {
    $_ = lc $key;  # convert to lowercase
    s/[\W_]//g;    # keep only alphanumeric characters

    my $expect = $tests{$key};
    my $note = ("\"$key\" should " . ($expect ? '' : 'not ') .
                "be a palindrome.");

    ok palindrome == $expect, 1, "palindrome: $note";
    ok palindrome_c == $expect, 1, "palindrome_c: $note";
    ok palindrome_r == $expect, 1, "palindrome_r: $note";
    ok palindrome_e == $expect, 1, "palindrome_e: $note";
}

The program produces TAP output.

$ perl ptest.t
1..24
# Running under perl version 5.010001 for openbsd
# Current time local: Mon Jan 31 17:44:06 2011
# Current time GMT:   Mon Jan 31 22:44:06 2011
# Using Test.pm version 1.25_02
ok 1
ok 2
ok 3
...
ok 24

The first line '1..24' plans for 24 tests, so that one can detect if the script aborted itself before it finished all the tests. A line like 'ok 1' is a passing test, 'not ok 1' is a failing test.

To find those 'not ok' lines, one can run a TAP harness. The "prove" program is a TAP harness that comes with Perl. (By default, "prove" runs all the test files in the "t" subdirectory. I did not make "t", so I will run "prove ptest.t" instead.)

$ prove ptest.t
ptest.t .. ok     
All tests successful.
Files=1, Tests=24,  0 wallclock secs ( 0.00 usr  0.02 sys +  0.01 cusr  0.00 csys =  0.03 CPU)
Result: PASS

All the tests passed! But suppose that palindrome_e() returned the wrong answer for the empty string "", then a test would fail.

$ perl ptest.t
...
ok 3
not ok 4
# Test 4 got: "" (ptest.t at line 36)
#   Expected: "1" (palindrome_e: "" should be a palindrome.)
#  ptest.t line 36 is:     ok palindrome_e == $expect, 1, "palindrome_e: $note";
ok 5
...
$ prove ptest.t                                                                
ptest.t .. 1/24 # Test 4 got: "" (ptest.t at line 36)
#   Expected: "1" (palindrome_e: "" should be a palindrome.)
#  ptest.t line 36 is:     ok palindrome_e == $expect, 1, "palindrome_e: $note";
ptest.t .. Failed 1/24 subtests 

Test Summary Report
-------------------
ptest.t (Wstat: 0 Tests: 24 Failed: 1)
  Failed test:  4
Files=1, Tests=24,  0 wallclock secs ( 0.02 usr  0.01 sys +  0.02 cusr  0.00 csys =  0.05 CPU)
Result: FAIL

Phix

Library: Phix/basics

The only golden rule here is to invoke test_summary() after any [block of] tests have been run, everything else is optional.

with javascript_semantics
requires("0.8.2")
 
function is_palindrome(sequence s)
    return s==reverse(s)
end function
 
--set_test_verbosity(TEST_QUIET)                -- default, no output when third call removed
--set_test_verbosity(TEST_SUMMARY)              -- first and last line only [w or w/o ""]
--set_test_verbosity(TEST_SHOW_FAILED)          -- first and last two lines only
set_test_verbosity(TEST_SHOW_ALL)               -- as shown in last two cases below
 
--set_test_abort(TEST_ABORT)                    -- abort(1) on failure, after showing the summary
--set_test_abort(TEST_QUIET)                    -- quietly carry on, the default
--set_test_abort(TEST_CRASH)                    -- abort immmediately on failure (w/o summary)

--set_test_pause(TEST_PAUSE_FAIL)               -- pause on failure, the default
--set_test_pause(TEST_QUIET)                    -- disable pause on failure
--set_test_pause(TEST_PAUSE)                    -- always pause

set_test_module("palindromes")                  -- optional, w/o first line is omitted
 
test_true(is_palindrome("abba"),"abba")
test_true(is_palindrome("abba"))                -- no desc makes success hidden...
                                                -- ...and failure somewhat laconic
test_false(is_palindrome("abc"),"not abc")
test_true(is_palindrome("failure"),"failure")
 
test_summary()

Note the default behaviour, if set_test_verbosity() is not invoked, is no output and carry on as normal when all tests pass.
Also note that set_test_pause() has no effect under pwa/p2js and the program will always carry on regardless of any failure,
unless set_test_abort() other than TEST_QUIET is in force. You can of course invoke these routines in a platform-dependent
way, for instance pause on the desktop but abort/stop completely in the browser, should that help.

Should you invoke a bunch of tests but forget the final test_summary(), then apart from set_test_abort(TEST_CRASH) any failures will slip by completely unnoticed.

Output:

The following shows example output from various set_test_verbosity() settings, with and without any failures.

TEST_QUIET with a failing test (no output or pause if no failing tests)
TEST_SUMMARY with a failure, same output

palindromes:

 4 tests run, 3 passed, 1 failed, 75% success
Press any key to continue...

TEST_SUMMARY with no failure (and without set_test_pause(TEST_PAUSE))
TEST_SHOW_FAILED with no failure, ditto

palindromes:

 3 tests run, 3 passed, 0 failed, 100% success

TEST_SHOW_FAILED with a failure

palindromes:
  failed: failure

 4 tests run, 3 passed, 1 failed, 75% success
Press any key to continue...

TEST_SHOW_ALL with a failure

palindromes:
  passed: abba
  passed: not abc
  failed: failure

 4 tests run, 3 passed, 1 failed, 75% success
Press any key to continue...

TEST_SHOW_ALL with no failure (and without set_test_pause(TEST_PAUSE))

palindromes:
  passed: abba
  passed: not abc

 3 tests run, 3 passed, 0 failed, 100% success

PicoLisp

The 'test' function is built into PicoLisp.

(de palindrome? (S)
   (= (setq S (chop S)) (reverse S)) )

(test T (palindrome? "racecar"))
(test NIL (palindrome? "ferrari"))

Prolog

SWI-Prolog has an inbuilt unit test functionality which is run automatically when building.

It can also be run by using the run_tests predicate.

palindrome(Word) :- name(Word,List), reverse(List,List).

:- begin_tests(palindrome).

test(valid_palindrome) :- palindrome('ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni').
test(invalid_palindrome, [fail]) :- palindrome('this is not a palindrome').

:- end_tests(palindrome).

PureBasic

PureBasic allows for definition of Assert() and other tools & the debugger is integrated into the native editor.

Macro DoubleQuote
  ; Needed for the Assert-Macro below
  "                             ; " second dlbquote to prevent Rosettas misshighlighting of following code. Remove comment before execution!
EndMacro
Macro Assert(TEST,MSG="")
  CompilerIf #PB_Compiler_Debugger
    If Not (TEST)
      If MSG<>"": Debug MSG: EndIf
      Temp$="Fail: "+DoubleQuote#TEST#DoubleQuote
      Debug Temp$+", Line="+Str(#PB_Compiler_Line)+" in "+#PB_Compiler_File
      CallDebugger
    EndIf
  CompilerEndIf
EndMacro

Procedure IsPalindrome(StringToTest.s)
  If StringToTest=ReverseString(StringToTest)
    ProcedureReturn 1
  Else
    ProcedureReturn 0
  EndIf
EndProcedure

text1$="racecar"
text2$="wisconsin"
Assert(IsPalindrome(text1$), "Catching this would be a fail")
Assert(IsPalindrome(text2$), "Catching this is correct")

Python

This uses the doctest module from the Python standard library. This allows copies of tests run in an interactive session to be re-used as tests.

def is_palindrome(s):
    '''
        >>> is_palindrome('')
        True
        >>> is_palindrome('a')
        True
        >>> is_palindrome('aa')
        True
        >>> is_palindrome('baa')
        False
        >>> is_palindrome('baab')
        True
        >>> is_palindrome('ba_ab')
        True
        >>> is_palindrome('ba_ ab')
        False
        >>> is_palindrome('ba _ ab')
        True
        >>> is_palindrome('ab'*2)
        False
        >>> x = 'ab' *2**15
        >>> len(x)
        65536
        >>> xreversed = x[::-1]
        >>> is_palindrome(x+xreversed)
        True
        >>> len(x+xreversed)
        131072
        >>> 
    '''
    return s == s[::-1]

def _test():
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
    #doctest.testmod(verbose=True)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    _test()

When run in the form as shown above there is no output as all tests pass. If the alternative doctest.testmod line is used with verbose=True, then the following output is produced:

Trying:
    is_palindrome('')
Expecting:
    True
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('a')
Expecting:
    True
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('aa')
Expecting:
    True
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('baa')
Expecting:
    False
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('baab')
Expecting:
    True
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('ba_ab')
Expecting:
    True
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('ba_ ab')
Expecting:
    False
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('ba _ ab')
Expecting:
    True
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome('ab'*2)
Expecting:
    False
ok
Trying:
    x = 'ab' *2**15
Expecting nothing
ok
Trying:
    len(x)
Expecting:
    65536
ok
Trying:
    xreversed = x[::-1]
Expecting nothing
ok
Trying:
    is_palindrome(x+xreversed)
Expecting:
    True
ok
Trying:
    len(x+xreversed)
Expecting:
    131072
ok
2 items had no tests:
    __main__
    __main__._test
1 items passed all tests:
  14 tests in __main__.is_palindrome
14 tests in 3 items.
14 passed and 0 failed.
Test passed.

Quackery

Quackery does not have a testing specific library well known to the language's community.

R

Library: RUnit

See also the functions defineTestSuite and runTestSuite.

checkTrue(palindroc("aba"))  # TRUE
checkTrue(!palindroc("ab"))  # TRUE
checkException(palindroc())  # TRUE
checkTrue(palindroc(""))     # Error.  Uh-oh, there's a bug in the function

Racket

Racket has a built-in unit testing library. Tests can be specified next to function implementations or in a testing submodule.

#lang racket
(module+ test (require rackunit))

;; from the Palindrome entry
(define (palindromb str)
  (let* ([lst (string->list (string-downcase str))]
         [slst (remove* '(#\space) lst)])
    (string=? (list->string (reverse slst)) (list->string slst))))

;; this test module is not loaded unless it is
;; specifically requested for testing, allowing internal
;; unit test specification
(module+ test
  (check-true (palindromb "racecar"))
  (check-true (palindromb "avoova"))
  (check-false (palindromb "potato")))

Raku

(formerly Perl 6)

use Test;

sub palin( Str $string) { so $string.lc.comb(/\w/) eq  $string.flip.lc.comb(/\w/) }

for
    'A man, a plan, a canal: Panama.'           => True,
    'My dog has fleas'                          => False,
    "Madam, I'm Adam."                          => True,
    '1 on 1'                                    => False,
    'In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni'    => True,
    ''                                          => True
{
  my ($test, $expected-result) = .kv;
    is palin($test), $expected-result,
        "\"$test\" is {$expected-result??''!!'not '}a palindrome.";
}

done-testing;
Output:
1..6
ok 1 - "1 on 1" is not a palindrome.
ok 2 - "My dog has fleas" is not a palindrome.
ok 3 - "A man, a plan, a canal: Panama." is a palindrome.
ok 4 - "" is a palindrome.
ok 5 - "Madam, I'm Adam." is a palindrome.
ok 6 - "In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni" is a palindrome.

Retro

Retro includes a library for creating automated tests. This is used for checking the standard libraries shipped with Retro.

needs assertion'
needs hash'

: palindrome? ( $-f ) dup ^hash'hash [ ^strings'reverse ^hash'hash ] dip = ;

with assertion'
: t0 ( - ) "hello" palindrome? 0 assert=  ; assertion 
: t1 ( - ) "ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni" palindrome? -1 assert=  ; assertion 
: test ( - ) t0 t1 ;
test

REXX

There is no official suite of programs, but the writers of the various REXX interpreters each have their own.

Listed below are two such examples that are used to "stress" the interpreter.

stress REXX keywords (used as variables)

{This was originally written in some form of FORTRAN.}

/*REXX program stresses various REXX functions (BIFs), many BIFs are used as variables. */
signal=(interpret=value); value=(interpret<parse); do upper=value to value; end
exit=upper*upper*upper*upper-value-upper; say=' '; return=say say say; with.=signal
do then=value to exit; pull=''; do otherwise= upper to then-,
value; select=otherwise-value; if.otherwise=with.otherwise+with.select; end
if.value=value; if.then=value; do otherwise=value to exit-then; pull=pull,
say''say; end; do otherwise=value to then; pull=pull center(if.otherwise,,
length(return)); end; say pull; do otherwise=value to exit; with.otherwise=,
if.otherwise; end; end; exit 0                   /*stick a fork in it,  we're all done. */
output :
                                       1
                                    1     1
                                 1     2     1
                              1     3     3     1
                           1     4     6     4     1
                        1     5    10    10     5     1
                     1     6    15    20    15     6     1
                  1     7    21    35    35    21     7     1
               1     8    28    56    70    56    28     8     1
            1     9    36    84    126   126   84    36     9     1
         1    10    45    120   210   252   210   120   45    10     1
      1    11    55    165   330   462   462   330   165   55    11     1
   1    12    66    220   495   792   924   792   495   220   66    12     1

stress test some REXX BIFs

This stress tests some of the REXX built-in functions (BIFs).

/*REXX program shows a secret message to the terminal by using REXX built─in functions. */
z.=' ';   z= 12-25-2002;   y= z;   w= -y
 z.0= translate( right( time('c'), substr(z, 4, z==y)))
 z.1= left( substr( format(z, 2, z==y, , z==y.1), 5), z==y)
 z.2= copies( right( symbol('z.'20), z==y), left(w, 1))
 z.3= translate( right( date('w'), z==y))
 z.5= right( form(), z==y)
 z.6= x2c( d2x( x2d( c2x( substr( symbol( substr(z, 2)), 2, z==y))) - 1))
 z.7= right( symbol('z.' || (z\==z) ), z==y)
 z.8= substr( form(), (z==y) + left(w, 1), z==y)
 z.9= reverse( left( form(), z==y))
z.10= left( substr( form(), 6), z==y)
z.11= right( datatype(z), z==y)
z.12= substr( symbol(left(z, z=z)), left(w, 1), z==y)
z.13= left( form(), z==y)

      do z=-31  to 31;   z.32= z.32 || z.z;  end
say
say z.32
say
exit 0                                           /*stick a fork in it,  we're all done. */
output :

                                MERRY CHRISTMAS

Because the REXX language is interpreted, many REXX stress tests are "simple" programs like those listed above, albeit highly obfuscated.

Ring

  assert(IsPalindrome("racecar"))
  assert(IsPalindrome("alice"))

Ruby

test/unit

Ruby comes with a unit testing package. All you have to do is to create a subclass of Test::Unit::Testcase that contains methods that begin with "test_". The package will create a test suite and run it for you.

def palindrome?(s)
  s == s.reverse
end

require 'test/unit'
class MyTests < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def test_palindrome_ok
    assert(palindrome? "aba")
  end

  def test_palindrome_nok
    assert_equal(false, palindrome?("ab"))
  end

  def test_object_without_reverse
    assert_raise(NoMethodError) {palindrome? 42}
  end

  def test_wrong_number_args
    assert_raise(ArgumentError) {palindrome? "a", "b"}
  end

  def test_show_failing_test
    assert(palindrome?("ab"), "this test case fails on purpose")
  end
end
$ ruby palindrome.rb
Loaded suite palindrome
Started
...F.
Finished in 0.018 seconds.

  1) Failure:
test_show_failing_test(MyTests) [palindrome.rb:24]:
this test case fails on purpose.
<false> is not true.

5 tests, 5 assertions, 1 failures, 0 errors

minitest

Many Ruby hackers have switched from 'test/unit' to other testing libraries. Some of these libraries provide the 'describe' block, which is just a pretty way to make a test case. RSpec, Bacon and minitest are such libraries.

This example uses Minitest, which comes with Ruby 1.9. (But if you have Ruby 1.8, then you can still install Minitest as a gem, using RubyGems.)

# palindrome.rb
def palindrome?(s)
  s == s.reverse
end
 
require 'minitest/spec'
require 'minitest/autorun'
describe "palindrome? function" do
  it "returns true if arg is a palindrome" do
    (palindrome? "aba").must_equal true
  end
 
  it "returns false if arg is not a palindrome" do
    palindrome?("ab").must_equal false
  end

  it "raises NoMethodError if arg is without #reverse" do
    proc { palindrome? 42 }.must_raise NoMethodError
  end

  it "raises ArgumentError if wrong number of args" do
    proc { palindrome? "a", "b" }.must_raise ArgumentError
  end

  it "passes a failing test" do
    palindrome?("ab").must_equal true, "this test case fails on purpose"
  end
end
$ ruby19 palindrome.rb 
Loaded suite palindrome
Started
..F..
Finished in 0.000629 seconds.

  1) Failure:
test_0005_passes_a_failing_test(PalindromeFunctionSpec) [palindrome.rb:26]:
this test case fails on purpose.
Expected false, not true.

5 tests, 5 assertions, 1 failures, 0 errors, 0 skips

Test run options: --seed 40770

Rust

Rust supports two ways of writing unit tests out of the box. Most tests are written as functions with #[test] attribute. When running cargo test (Cargo is the build and package manager), these functions are executed. The test functions are usually placed in a separate module and excluded from regular builds; as the example shows, the whole module with tests has #[cfg(test)] attribute which has this effect.

The other way is using documentation comments. The documentation can contain code snippets and rustdoc (or cargo) compiles and runs these code snippets as tests (it is possible to specify the expected outcome, including the situation that the snippet should fail to compile). Note that the documentation tests work for libraries only (as for Rust 1.46) and are not run for binary crates.

In either case, the tests are supposed to use assert! macro (and its variants assert_eq! and assert_ne!) to check the expected outcomes. These macros can be used in regular code as well and always execute. When an assertion should be checked in debug builds only, debug_assert! and its variants can be used instead.

/// Tests if the given string slice is a palindrome (with the respect to
/// codepoints, not graphemes).
///
/// # Examples
///
/// ```
/// # use playground::palindrome::is_palindrome;
/// assert!(is_palindrome("abba"));
/// assert!(!is_palindrome("baa"));
/// ```
pub fn is_palindrome(s: &str) -> bool {
    let half = s.len();
    s.chars().take(half).eq(s.chars().rev().take(half))
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {

    use super::is_palindrome;

    #[test]
    fn test_is_palindrome() {
        assert!(is_palindrome("abba"));
    }
}

While unit tests are written together with the tested code (and thus may employ the white-box test approach), the code may be accompanied yet with integration tests, conventionally provided in the tests/ folder. Integration tests are considered external and use the public interface as any other external code.

Scala

Library: ScalaCheck

There are three main Scala testing libraries: ScalaCheck, ScalaTest and Specs. The first is shown here, being similar to Haskell's QuickCheck.

import org.scalacheck._
import Prop._
import Gen._

object PalindromeCheck extends Properties("Palindrome") {
  property("A string concatenated with its reverse is a palindrome") =
    forAll { s: String => isPalindrome(s + s.reverse) }
    
  property("A string concatenated with any character and its reverse is a palindrome") =
    forAll { (s: String, c: Char) => isPalindrome(s + c + s.reverse) }
    
  property("If the first half of a string is equal to the reverse of its second half, it is a palindrome") =
    forAll { (s: String) => s.take(s.length / 2) != s.drop((s.length + 1) / 2).reverse || isPalindrome(s) }
    
  property("If the first half of a string is different than the reverse of its second half, it isn't a palindrome") =
    forAll { (s: String) => s.take(s.length / 2) == s.drop((s.length + 1) / 2).reverse || !isPalindrome(s) }
    
}

Output:

+ Palindrome.A string concatenated with its reverse is a palindrome: OK, pa
  ssed 100 tests.
+ Palindrome.A string concatenated with any character and its reverse is a
  palindrome: OK, passed 100 tests.
+ Palindrome.If the first half of a string is equal to the reverse of its s
  econd half, it is a palindrome: OK, passed 100 tests.
+ Palindrome.If the first half of a string is different than the reverse of
   its second half, it isn't a palindrome: OK, passed 100 tests.

Scheme

Library: Scheme/SRFIs

SRFI 64 is a popular test library.

(import (srfi 64))
(test-begin "palindrome-tests")
(test-assert (palindrome? "ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni"))
(test-assert (not (palindrome? "This is not a palindrome")))
(test-equal #t (palindrome? "ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni")) ; another of several test functions
(test-end)

The library reports the number of pass/fail tests at the end; the report may be customised. Also, a detailed log file is created, showing the results of each test.

SQL PL

Works with: Db2 LUW
Library: db2unit
CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE TEST_MY_TEST()
  BEGIN
    DECLARE EXPECTED INTEGER;
    DECLARE ACTUAL INTEGER;
    CALL DB2UNIT.REGISTER_MESSAGE('My first test');
    SET EXPECTED = 2;
    SET ACTUAL = 1+1;
    CALL DB2UNIT.ASSERT_INT_EQUALS('Same value', EXPECTED, ACTUAL);
  END @

Output:

db2 => CALL DB2UNIT.RUN_SUITE('DB2UNIT_EXAMPLE');


  Result set 1
  --------------

  TEST             FINAL_STATE MICROSECONDS MESSAGE                                                         
  ---------------- ----------- ------------ ----------------------------------------------------------------
  Before Suite     -                      - Starting execution                                              
  TEST_MY_TEST     Passed             29585 Executing TEST_MY_TEST                                          
  After Suite      -                      - Finishing execution                                             
                   -                      - 1 tests were executed                                           
                   -                      - 1 tests passed                                                  
                   -                      - 0 tests failed                                                  
                   -                      - 0 tests with errors                                             

  7 record(s) selected.


  Result set 2
  --------------

  TIME     EXECUTION_ID STATUS                MESSAGE                                                       
  -------- ------------ --------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------
  20:43:47        52613 Initialization        db2unit is licensed under the terms of the GPL v3             
  20:43:47        52613 Initialization        Execution of DB2UNIT_EXAMPLE with ID 52613                             
  20:43:47        52613 Prepare Report        The reports table created: DB2UNIT_EXAMPLE.REPORT_TESTS                
  20:43:48        52613 Calculating time      Total execution time is: 0 seconds                            

  4 record(s) selected.

  Return Status = 0

Swift

import Cocoa
import XCTest

class PalindromTests: XCTestCase {
    
    override func setUp() {
        super.setUp()
        
    }
    
    override func tearDown() {
        super.tearDown()
    }
    
    func testPalindrome() {
        // This is an example of a functional test case.
        XCTAssert(isPalindrome("abcba"), "Pass")
        XCTAssert(isPalindrome("aa"), "Pass")
        XCTAssert(isPalindrome("a"), "Pass")
        XCTAssert(isPalindrome(""), "Pass")
        XCTAssert(isPalindrome("ab"), "Pass") // Fail
        XCTAssert(isPalindrome("aa"), "Pass")
        XCTAssert(isPalindrome("abcdba"), "Pass") // Fail
    }
    
    func testPalindromePerformance() {
        // This is an example of a performance test case.
        self.measureBlock() {
            var _is = isPalindrome("abcba")
        }
    }
}

Tailspin

templates palindrome
  [$...] -> #
  when <=$(last..first:-1)> do '$...;' !
end palindrome

test 'palindrome filter'
  assert 'rotor' -> palindrome <='rotor'> 'rotor is a palindrome'
  assert ['rosetta' -> palindrome] <=[]> 'rosetta is not a palindrome'
end 'palindrome filter'

Tcl

Testing with Tcl is just about universally performed with the tcltest package, which was originally developed for testing Tcl itself, and which is a standard part of a tclsh installation.

Library: tcltest
package require tcltest 2
source palindrome.tcl; # Assume that this is what loads the implementation of ‘palindrome’

tcltest::test palindrome-1 {check for palindromicity} -body {
    palindrome abcdedcba
} -result 1
tcltest::test palindrome-2 {check for non-palindromicity} -body {
    palindrome abcdef
} -result 0
tcltest::test palindrome-3 {check for palindrome error} -body {
    palindrome
} -returnCodes error -result "wrong # args: should be \"palindrome s\""

tcltest::cleanupTests

If placed in a file called palindrome.test, the following output is produced when it is executed:

palindrome.test:   Total   3   Passed  3   Skipped 0   Failed  0

Note that only a small fraction of the features of the testing framework are demonstrated here. In particular, it does not show off management of conditional execution, the application of setup and cleanup code, and how these things are assembled into a whole test suite for a large system.

UNIX Shell

#!/bin/bash

is_palindrome() {
  local s1=$1
  local s2=$(echo $1 | tr -d "[ ,!:;.'\"]" | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]')

  if [[ $s2 = $(echo $s2 | rev) ]]
  then
     echo "[$s1] is a palindrome"
  else
     echo "[$s1] is NOT a palindrome"
  fi
}

is_palindrome "A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!" is_palindrome "Madam, I'm Adam" is_palindrome "1 on 1"</a>

VBA

Using the StrReverse function after deleted spaces

Option Explicit

Sub Test_a_function()
Dim a, i&
    a = Array("abba", "mom", "dennis sinned", "Un roc lamina l animal cornu", "palindrome", "ba _ ab", "racecars", "racecar", "wombat", "in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni")
    For i = 0 To UBound(a)
        Debug.Print a(i) & " is a palidrome ? " & IsPalindrome(CStr(a(i)))
    Next
End Sub

Function IsPalindrome(txt As String) As Boolean
Dim tempTxt As String
    tempTxt = LCase(Replace(txt, " ", ""))
    IsPalindrome = (tempTxt = StrReverse(tempTxt))
End Function
Output:
abba is a palidrome ? True
mom is a palidrome ? True
dennis sinned is a palidrome ? True
Un roc lamina l animal cornu is a palidrome ? True
palindrome is a palidrome ? False
ba _ ab is a palidrome ? True
racecars is a palidrome ? False
racecar is a palidrome ? True
wombat is a palidrome ? False
in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni is a palidrome ? True

Wren

Library: Wren-test
import "/module" for Expect, Suite, ConsoleReporter

var isPal = Fn.new { |word| word == ((word.count > 0) ? word[-1..0] : "") }

var words = ["rotor", "rosetta", "step on no pets", "été", "wren", "🦊😀🦊"]
var expected = [true, false, true, true, false, true]

var TestPal = Suite.new("Pal") { |it|
    it.suite("'isPal' function:") { |it|
        for (i in 0...words.count) {
            it.should("return '%(expected[i])' for '%(words[i])' is palindrome") {
                Expect.call(isPal.call(words[i])).toEqual(expected[i])
            }
        }
    }
}

var reporter = ConsoleReporter.new()
TestPal.run(reporter)
reporter.epilogue()
Output:
Palindromes:
  'isPal' function:
    ✓ should return 'true' for 'rotor' is palindrome
    ✓ should return 'false' for 'rosetta' is palindrome
    ✓ should return 'true' for 'step on no pets' is palindrome
    ✓ should return 'true' for 'été' is palindrome
    ✓ should return 'false' for 'wren' is palindrome
    ✓ should return 'true' for '🦊😀🦊' is palindrome


==== Tests Summary ====
  6 tests, 6 passed, 0 failed, 0 errors, 0 skipped (1 ms)

zkl

fcn pali(text){
   if (text.len()<2) return(False);
   text==text.reverse();
}
tester:=TheVault.Test.UnitTester.UnitTester(__FILE__);
   // spaces make this not a palindrome
tester.testRun(pali.fp("red rum sir is murder"), Void,False,__LINE__);

Need to create a closure (.fp) so the unit test is what runs the test function and can catch any errors the test function throws.

Output:
===================== Unit Test 1 =====================
Test 1 passed!

A test file:

tester:=TheVault.Test.UnitTester.UnitTester(__FILE__);
fcn pali(text){
   if (text.len()<2) return(False);
   text==text.reverse();
}
tester.testRun(pali.fp("red rum sir is murder" - " "), Void,True,__LINE__);
tester.testRun(pali.fp("red rum sir is murder"), Void,True,__LINE__); //bad test
tester.testSrc("var R=(1+2)",Void,Void,3,__LINE__); // you can test source too

tester.stats();
returnClass(tester);
zkl paliTest.zkl
Output:
======== Unit Test 1 =====paliTest.zkl==6========
Test 1 passed!
======== Unit Test 2 =====paliTest.zkl==7========
Result and expected result are different: False True
Test 2 failed. I hate it when that happens (line 7).
======== Unit Test 3 =====paliTest.zkl==8========
Test 3 passed!
3 tests completed.
Passed test(s): 2 (of 3)
Failed test(s): 1, tests L(2)

If you had a collection of files to test:

zkl Test.testThemAll -- paliTest.zkl
Output:
... as above
---------.--------.----------
---------|00:00:00|----------
-----------------------------
paliTest.zkl
3 tests completed.
Passed test(s): 2 (of 3)
Failed test(s): 1, tests L(2)

Executive summary: 1 pass in 00:00:00
   3 tests completed (1 files)
   Passed test(s): 2 (of 3)
   Failed test(s):  1
   Flawed test(s):  0
   Failed files(s): 0

That used 6 simultaneous VMs, 4 of which were threads.
Number of VMs consumed: 30