Mersenne primes

From Rosetta Code
Mersenne primes is a draft programming task. It is not yet considered ready to be promoted as a complete task, for reasons that should be found in its talk page.

Mersenne primes:

Challenge:

Create code that will list (preferably calculate) all of the Mersenne primes until some limitation is reached. For information on what a Mersenne prime is, go to this link: [[1]]

AppleScript[edit]

 
on isPrime(integ)
set isComposite to ""
if (integ / 2) = (integ / 2 div 1) then
log integ & " is composite because 2 is a factor" as string --buttons {"OK", "Cancel"} default button 1 cancel button 2
 
else
set x to 2
set sqrtOfInteg to integ ^ 0.5
repeat until x = integ ^ 0.5 + 1 as integer
if (integ / x) = integ / x div 1 then
log integ & " is composite because " & x & " & " & (integ / x div 1) & " are factors" as string --buttons {"OK", "Cancel"} default button 1 cancel button 2
set isComposite to 1
set x to x + 1
else
 
set x to x + 1
end if
 
 
 
end repeat
log integ & " is prime" as string --buttons {"OK", "Cancel"} default button 1 cancel button 2
if isComposite = 1 then
log integ & "is composite"
else
display dialog integ
end if
end if
 
end isPrime
set x to 2
repeat
isPrime(((2 ^ x) - 1) div 1)
set x to x + 1
end repeat
 

D[edit]

Simplest thing that could possibly work. Using better primality tests will allow for more results to be calculated in a reasonable amount of time.

import std.bigint;
import std.stdio;
 
bool isPrime(BigInt bi) {
if (bi < 2) return false;
if (bi % 2 == 0) return bi == 2;
if (bi % 3 == 0) return bi == 3;
 
auto test = BigInt(5);
while (test * test < bi) {
if (bi % test == 0) return false;
test += 2;
if (bi % test == 0) return false;
test += 4;
}
 
return true;
}
 
void main() {
auto base = BigInt(2);
 
for (int pow=1; pow<32; pow++) {
if (isPrime(base-1)) {
writeln("2 ^ ", pow, " - 1");
}
base *= 2;
}
}
Output:
2 ^ 2 - 1
2 ^ 3 - 1
2 ^ 5 - 1
2 ^ 7 - 1
2 ^ 13 - 1
2 ^ 17 - 1
2 ^ 19 - 1
2 ^ 31 - 1

Julia[edit]

Works with: Julia version 0.6

Julia module Primes uses Miller-Rabin primality test.

using Primes
 
mersenne(n::Integer) = convert(typeof(n), 2) ^ n - one(n)
function main(nmax::Integer)
n = ith = zero(nmax)
while ith ≤ nmax
if isprime(mersenne(n))
println("M$n")
ith += 1
end
n += 1
end
end
 
main(big(20))
Output:
M2
M3
M5
M7
M13
M17
M19
M31
M61
M89
M107
M127
M521
M607
M1279
M2203
M2281
M3217
M4253
M4423
M9689

Kotlin[edit]

This task is similar to the Lucas-Lehmer test task except that you can use whatever method you like to test the primality of the Mersenne numbers. Here, I've chosen to use the JDK's BigInteger.isProbablePrime(certainty) method. The exact algorithm is implementation dependent --- GNU classpath uses only Miller-Rabin, while Oracle JDK uses Miller-Rabin and sometimes adds a Lucas test (this is not the Lucas-Lehmer test).

A 'certainty' parameter of 10 is enough to find the first 20 Mersenne primes but as even this takes about 90 seconds on my modest machine I've not bothered going beyond that.

// version 1.2.10
 
import java.math.BigInteger
 
const val MAX = 20
 
val bigOne = BigInteger.ONE
val bigTwo = 2.toBigInteger()
 
/* for checking 'small' primes */
fun isPrime(n: Int): Boolean {
if (n < 2) return false
if (n % 2 == 0) return n == 2
if (n % 3 == 0) return n == 3
var d : Int = 5
while (d * d <= n) {
if (n % d == 0) return false
d += 2
if (n % d == 0) return false
d += 4
}
return true
}
 
fun main(args: Array<String>) {
var count = 0
var p = 2
while (true) {
val m = (bigTwo shl (p - 1)) - bigOne
if (m.isProbablePrime(10)) {
println("2 ^ $p - 1")
if (++count == MAX) break
}
// obtain next prime, p
while(true) {
p = if (p > 2) p + 2 else 3
if (isPrime(p)) break
}
}
}
Output:
2 ^ 2 - 1
2 ^ 3 - 1
2 ^ 5 - 1
2 ^ 7 - 1
2 ^ 13 - 1
2 ^ 17 - 1
2 ^ 19 - 1
2 ^ 31 - 1
2 ^ 61 - 1
2 ^ 89 - 1
2 ^ 107 - 1
2 ^ 127 - 1
2 ^ 521 - 1
2 ^ 607 - 1
2 ^ 1279 - 1
2 ^ 2203 - 1
2 ^ 2281 - 1
2 ^ 3217 - 1
2 ^ 4253 - 1
2 ^ 4423 - 1

PARI/GP[edit]

LL(p)={
my(m=Mod(4,1<<p-1));
for(i=3,p,m=m^2-2);
m==0
};
forprime(p=2,, if(LL(p), print("2^"p"-1")))

Perl[edit]

Since GIMPS went to the trouble of dedicating thousands of CPU years to finding Mersenne primes, we should be kind enough to use the results. The ntheory module front end does this, so the results up to 43 million is extremely fast (4 seconds), and we can reduce this another 10x by only checking primes. After the GIMPS double-checked mark, a Lucas-Lehmer test is done using code similar to Rosetta Code Lucas-Lehmer in C+GMP.

If this is too contrived, we can use Math::Prime::Util::GMP::is_mersenne_prime instead, which will run the Lucas-Lehmer test on each input. The first 23 Mersenne primes are found in under 15 seconds.

Library: ntheory
use ntheory qw/forprimes is_mersenne_prime/;
forprimes { is_mersenne_prime($_) && say } 1e9;
Output:
2
3
5
7
13
17
19
31
61
...

Perl 6[edit]

Works with: Rakudo version 2018.01

We already have a multitude of tasks that demonstrate how to find Mersenne primes; Prime decomposition, Primality by trial division, Trial factoring of a Mersenne number, Lucas-Lehmer test, Miller–Rabin primality_test, etc. that all have Perl 6 entries. I'm not sure what I could add here that would be useful.

Hmmm.

Create code that will list all of the Mersenne primes until some limitation is reached.

It doesn't specify to calculate them, only to list them; why throw away all of the computer millenia of processing power that the GIMPS has invested?

use HTTP::UserAgent;
use Gumbo;
 
my $table = parse-html(HTTP::UserAgent.new.get('https://www.mersenne.org/primes/').content, :TAG<table>);
 
say 'All known Mersenne primes as of ', Date(now);
 
say 'M', ++$, ": 2$_ - 1"
for $table[1]».[*][0][*].comb(/'exp_lo='\d+/)».subst(/\D/, '',:g)
.trans([<0123456789>.comb] => [<⁰¹²³⁴⁵⁶⁷⁸⁹>.comb]).words;
 
Output:
All known Mersenne primes as of 2018-01-27
M1: 2² - 1
M2: 2³ - 1
M3: 2⁵ - 1
M4: 2⁷ - 1
M5: 2¹³ - 1
M6: 2¹⁷ - 1
M7: 2¹⁹ - 1
M8: 2³¹ - 1
M9: 2⁶¹ - 1
M10: 2⁸⁹ - 1
M11: 2¹⁰⁷ - 1
M12: 2¹²⁷ - 1
M13: 2⁵²¹ - 1
M14: 2⁶⁰⁷ - 1
M15: 2¹²⁷⁹ - 1
M16: 2²²⁰³ - 1
M17: 2²²⁸¹ - 1
M18: 2³²¹⁷ - 1
M19: 2⁴²⁵³ - 1
M20: 2⁴⁴²³ - 1
M21: 2⁹⁶⁸⁹ - 1
M22: 2⁹⁹⁴¹ - 1
M23: 2¹¹²¹³ - 1
M24: 2¹⁹⁹³⁷ - 1
M25: 2²¹⁷⁰¹ - 1
M26: 2²³²⁰⁹ - 1
M27: 2⁴⁴⁴⁹⁷ - 1
M28: 2⁸⁶²⁴³ - 1
M29: 2¹¹⁰⁵⁰³ - 1
M30: 2¹³²⁰⁴⁹ - 1
M31: 2²¹⁶⁰⁹¹ - 1
M32: 2⁷⁵⁶⁸³⁹ - 1
M33: 2⁸⁵⁹⁴³³ - 1
M34: 2¹²⁵⁷⁷⁸⁷ - 1
M35: 2¹³⁹⁸²⁶⁹ - 1
M36: 2²⁹⁷⁶²²¹ - 1
M37: 2³⁰²¹³⁷⁷ - 1
M38: 2⁶⁹⁷²⁵⁹³ - 1
M39: 2¹³⁴⁶⁶⁹¹⁷ - 1
M40: 2²⁰⁹⁹⁶⁰¹¹ - 1
M41: 2²⁴⁰³⁶⁵⁸³ - 1
M42: 2²⁵⁹⁶⁴⁹⁵¹ - 1
M43: 2³⁰⁴⁰²⁴⁵⁷ - 1
M44: 2³²⁵⁸²⁶⁵⁷ - 1
M45: 2³⁷¹⁵⁶⁶⁶⁷ - 1
M46: 2⁴²⁶⁴³⁸⁰¹ - 1
M47: 2⁴³¹¹²⁶⁰⁹ - 1
M48: 2⁵⁷⁸⁸⁵¹⁶¹ - 1
M49: 2⁷⁴²⁰⁷²⁸¹ - 1
M50: 2⁷⁷²³²⁹¹⁷ - 1

Ring[edit]

 
# Project : Mersenne primes
# Date  : 2018/01/22
# Author : Gal Zsolt [~ CalmoSoft ~]
# Email  : <[email protected]>
 
n = 0
while true
n = n +1
if isprime(pow(2,n)-1) = 1
see n + nl
ok
end
 
func isprime num
if (num <= 1) return 0 ok
if (num % 2 = 0) and num != 2 return 0 ok
for i = 3 to floor(num / 2) -1 step 2
if (num % i = 0) return 0 ok
next
return 1
 

Output:

2
3
5
7
13
17
19

Sidef[edit]

Uses the is_mersenne_prime() function from Math::Prime::Util::GMP.

for p in (^Inf -> lazy.grep { .is_mersenne_prime }) {
say "2^#{p} - 1"
}
Output:
2^2 - 1
2^3 - 1
2^5 - 1
2^7 - 1
2^13 - 1
2^17 - 1
2^19 - 1
2^31 - 1
2^61 - 1
2^89 - 1
2^107 - 1
2^127 - 1
2^521 - 1
2^607 - 1
2^1279 - 1
2^2203 - 1
2^2281 - 1
2^3217 - 1
2^4253 - 1
2^4423 - 1
2^9689 - 1
2^9941 - 1
^C
sidef mersenne.sf  12.47s user 0.02s system 99% cpu 12.495 total

zkl[edit]

Uses libGMP (GNU MP Bignum Library) and its Miller-Rabin probabilistic primality testing algorithm.

var [const] BN=Import("zklBigNum");  // libGMP
fcn mprimes{
n,m := BN(2),0;
foreach e in ([2..]){
n,m = n.shiftLeft(1), n-1;
if(m.probablyPrime()) println("2^%d - 1".fmt(e));
}
}()
// gets rather slow after M(4423)
Output:
2^2 - 1
2^3 - 1
2^5 - 1
2^7 - 1
2^13 - 1
2^17 - 1
2^19 - 1
2^31 - 1
2^61 - 1
2^89 - 1
2^107 - 1
2^127 - 1
2^521 - 1
2^607 - 1
2^1279 - 1
2^2203 - 1
2^2281 - 1
2^3217 - 1
2^4253 - 1
2^4423 - 1
2^9689 - 1
2^9941 - 1
2^11213 - 1
...