User input/Text

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Task
User input/Text
You are encouraged to solve this task according to the task description, using any language you may know.
User input/Text is part of Short Circuit's Console Program Basics selection.
In this task, the goal is to input a string and the integer 75000, from the text console.

See also: User input/Graphical

Contents

[edit] Ada

Works with: GCC version 4.1.2
function Get_String return String is
Line : String (1 .. 1_000);
Last : Natural;
begin
Get_Line (Line, Last);
return Line (1 .. Last);
end Get_String;
 
function Get_Integer return Integer is
S : constant String := Get_String;
begin
return Integer'Value (S);
-- may raise exception Constraint_Error if value entered is not a well-formed integer
end Get_Integer;
 

The functions above may be called as shown below

My_String  : String  := Get_String;
My_Integer : Integer := Get_Integer;

[edit] ALGOL 68

print("Enter a string: ");
STRING s := read string;
print("Enter a number: ");
INT i := read int;
~

[edit] AutoHotkey

[edit] Windows console

DllCall("AllocConsole")
FileAppend, please type something`n, CONOUT$
FileReadLine, line, CONIN$, 1
msgbox % line
FileAppend, please type '75000'`n, CONOUT$
FileReadLine, line, CONIN$, 1
msgbox % line

[edit] Input Command

this one takes input regardless of which application has focus.

TrayTip, Input:, Type a string:
Input(String)
TrayTip, Input:, Type an int:
Input(Int)
TrayTip, Done!, Input was recieved.
Msgbox, You entered "%String%" and "%Int%"
ExitApp
Return
 
Input(ByRef Output)
{
Loop
{
Input, Char, L1, {Enter}{Space}
If ErrorLevel contains Enter
Break
Else If ErrorLevel contains Space
Output .= " "
Else
Output .= Char
TrayTip, Input:, %Output%
}
}

[edit] AWK

This demo shows a same-line prompt, and that the integer i becomes 0 if the line did not parse as an integer.

~/src/opt/run $ awk 'BEGIN{printf "enter a string: "}{s=$0;i=$0+0;print "ok,"s"/"i}'
enter a string: hello world
ok,hello world/0
75000
ok,75000/75000

[edit] BASIC

Many BASICs will automatically append a question mark (?) to the end of the prompt if the prompt is followed by a semicolon (;). (Some of those will skip the question mark if the prompt is followed by a comma (,) instead of a semicolon.)

This isn't a hard-and-fast rule -- for example, Chipmunk Basic never appends a question mark.

INPUT "Enter a string"; s$
INPUT "Enter a number: ", i%

Output (QBasic):

Enter a string? foo
Enter a number: 1

[edit] Applesoft BASIC

10 INPUT "ENTER A STRING: "; S$
20 INPUT "ENTER A NUMBER: ", I%

[edit] Batch File

@echo off
set /p var=
echo %var% 75000

[edit] BBC BASIC

      INPUT LINE "Enter a string: " string$
INPUT "Enter a number: " number
 
PRINT "String = """ string$ """"
PRINT "Number = " ; number

[edit] Befunge

This prompts for a string and pushes it to the stack a character at a time (~) until end of input (-1).

<>:v:"Enter a string: "
^,_ >~:1+v
^ _@

Numeric input is easier, using the & command.

<>:v:"Enter a number: "
^,_ & @

[edit] C

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
 
int main(void)
{
// Get a string from stdin
char str[BUFSIZ];
puts("Enter a string: ");
fgets(str, sizeof(str), stdin);
 
// Get 75000 from stdin
long num;
char buf[BUFSIZ];
do
{
puts("Enter 75000: ");
fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), stdin);
num = strtol(buf, NULL, 10);
} while (num != 75000);
 
return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

[edit] C++

Works with: g++
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
 
int main()
{
// while probably all current implementations have int wide enough for 75000, the C++ standard
// only guarantees this for long int.
long int integer_input;
string string_input;
cout << "Enter an integer: ";
cin >> integer_input;
cout << "Enter a string: ";
cin >> string_input;
return 0;
}

Note: The program as written above only reads the string up to the first whitespace character. To get a complete line into the string, replace

 cin >> string_input;

with

 getline(cin, string_input);

Note: if a numeric input operation fails, the value is not stored for that operation, plus the fail bit is set, which causes all future stream operations to be ignored (e.g. if a non-integer is entered for the first input above, then nothing will be stored in either the integer and the string). A more complete program would test for an error in the input (with if (!cin) // handle error) after the first input, and then clear the error (with cin.clear()) if we want to get further input.

Alternatively, we could read the input into a string first, and then parse that into an int later.

[edit] C#

using System;
 
namespace C_Sharp_Console {
 
class example {
 
static void Main() {
string word;
int num;
 
Console.Write("Enter an integer: ");
num = Console.Read();
Console.Write("Enter a String: ");
word = Console.ReadLine();
}
}
}

[edit] Clojure

(import '(java.util Scanner))
(def scan (Scanner. *in*))
(def s (.nextLine scan))
(def n (.nextInt scan))

[edit] COBOL

Works with: OpenCOBOL
       IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID. Get-Input.
 
DATA DIVISION.
WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
01 Input-String PIC X(30).
01 Input-Int PIC 9(5).
 
PROCEDURE DIVISION.
DISPLAY "Enter a string:"
ACCEPT Input-String
 
DISPLAY "Enter a number:"
ACCEPT Input-Int
 
GOBACK
.

[edit] Common Lisp

(format t "Enter some text: ")
(let ((s (read-line)))
(format t "You entered ~s~%" s))
 
(format t "Enter a number: ")
(let ((n (read)))
(if (numberp n)
(format t "You entered ~d.~%" n)
(format t "That was not a number.")))

[edit] D

import std.stdio;
 
void main() {
long number;
write("Enter an integer: ");
readf("%d", &number);
 
char[] str;
write("Enter a string: ");
readf(" %s\n", &str);
 
writeln("Read in '", number, "' and '", str, "'");
}

[edit] Delphi

program UserInputText;
 
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
 
uses SysUtils;
 
var
s: string;
lStringValue: string;
lIntegerValue: Integer;
begin
WriteLn('Enter a string:');
Readln(lStringValue);
 
repeat
WriteLn('Enter the number 75000');
Readln(s);
lIntegerValue := StrToIntDef(s, 0);
if lIntegerValue <> 75000 then
Writeln('Invalid entry: ' + s);
until lIntegerValue = 75000;
end.

[edit] Déjà Vu

input s:
 !print\ s
 !decode!utf-8 !read-line!stdin
local :astring input "Enter a string: "
true
while:
try:
to-num input "Enter the number 75000: "
/= 75000
catch value-error:
true

[edit] Erlang

{ok, [String]} = io:fread("Enter a string: ","~s").
{ok, [Number]} = io:fread("Enter a number: ","~d").

Alternatively, you could use io:get_line to get a string:

 String = io:get_line("Enter a string: ").

[edit] Euphoria

include get.e
 
sequence s
atom n
 
s = prompt_string("Enter a string:")
puts(1, s & '\n')
n = prompt_number("Enter a number:",{})
printf(1, "%d", n)

[edit] Factor

"Enter a string: " write
readln
"Enter a number: " write
readln string>number

[edit] Falcon

printl("Enter a string:")
str = input()
printl("Enter a number:")
n = int(input())

[edit] FALSE

FALSE has neither a string type nor numeric input. Shown instead are routines to parse and echo a word and to parse and interpret a number using the character input command (^).

[[^$' =~][,]#,]w:
[0[^'0-$$9>0@>|~][\10*+]#%]d:
w;! d;!.

[edit] Fantom

The 'toInt' method on an input string will throw an exception if the input is not a number.

 
class Main
{
public static Void main ()
{
Env.cur.out.print ("Enter a string: ").flush
str := Env.cur.in.readLine
echo ("Entered :$str:")
Env.cur.out.print ("Enter 75000: ").flush
Int n
try n = Env.cur.in.readLine.toInt
catch (Err e)
{
echo ("You had to enter a number")
return
}
echo ("Entered :$n: which is " + ((n == 75000) ? "correct" : "wrong"))
}
}
 

[edit] Forth

[edit] Input a string

: INPUT$ ( n -- addr n )
PAD SWAP ACCEPT
PAD SWAP ;

[edit] Input a number

The only ANS standard number interpretation word is >NUMBER ( ud str len -- ud str len ), which is meant to be the base factor for more convenient (but non-standard) parsing words.

: INPUT# ( -- u true | false )
0. 16 INPUT$ DUP >R
>NUMBER NIP NIP
R> <> DUP 0= IF NIP THEN ;
Works with: GNU Forth
: INPUT# ( -- n true | d 1 | false )
16 INPUT$ SNUMBER? ;
Works with: Win32Forth
: INPUT# ( -- n true | false )
16 INPUT$ NUMBER? NIP
DUP 0= IF NIP THEN ;

Note that NUMBER? always leaves a double result on the stack. INPUT# returns a single precision number. If you desire a double precision result, remove the NIP.

Works with: 4tH
: input#
begin
refill drop bl parse-word ( a n)
number error? ( n f)
while ( n)
drop ( --)
repeat ( n)
;

Here is an example that puts it all together:

: TEST
." Enter your name: " 80 INPUT$ CR
." Hello there, " TYPE CR
." Enter a number: " INPUT# CR
IF ." Your number is " .
ELSE ." That's not a number!" THEN CR ;

[edit] Fortran

Works with: Fortran version 90 and later
character(20) :: s
integer :: i
 
print*, "Enter a string (max 20 characters)"
read*, s
print*, "Enter the integer 75000"
read*, i

[edit] Go

Go has C-like Scan and Scanf functions for quick and dirty input:

package main
 
import "fmt"
 
func main() {
var s string
var i int
if _, err := fmt.Scan(&s, &i); err == nil && i == 75000 {
fmt.Println("good")
} else {
fmt.Println("wrong")
}
}

Code below allows much more control over interaction and error checking.

 
package main
 
import (
"bufio"
"fmt"
"os"
"strconv"
"strings"
)
 
func main() {
in := bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
 
fmt.Print("Enter string: ")
s, err := in.ReadString('\n')
if err != nil {
fmt.Println(err)
return
}
s = strings.TrimSpace(s)
 
fmt.Print("Enter 75000: ")
s, err = in.ReadString('\n')
if err != nil {
fmt.Println(err)
return
}
n, err := strconv.Atoi(strings.TrimSpace(s))
if err != nil {
fmt.Println(err)
return
}
if n != 75000 {
fmt.Println("fail: not 75000")
return
}
fmt.Println("Good")
}
 

[edit] Frink

 
s = input["Enter a string: "]
i = parseInt[input["Enter an integer: "]]
 

[edit] Groovy

word = System.in.readLine()
num = System.in.readLine().toInteger()

[edit] Haskell

import System.IO (hFlush, stdout)
main = do
putStr "Enter a string: "
hFlush stdout
str <- getLine
putStr "Enter an integer: "
hFlush stdout
num <- readLn :: IO Int
putStrLn $ str ++ (show num)

Note: :: IO Int is only there to disambiguate what type we wanted from read. If num were used in a numerical context, its type would have been inferred by the interpreter/compiler. Note also: Haskell doesn't automatically flush stdout when doing input, so explicit flushes are necessary.

[edit] Icon and Unicon

The following works in both Icon and Unicon:

 
procedure main ()
writes ("Enter something: ")
s := read ()
write ("You entered: " || s)
 
writes ("Enter 75000: ")
if (i := integer (read ())) then
write (if (i = 75000) then "correct" else "incorrect")
else write ("you must enter a number")
end
 

[edit] Io

string := File clone standardInput readLine("Enter a string: ")
integer := File clone standardInput readLine("Enter 75000: ") asNumber

[edit] J

Solution

   require 'misc'            NB. load system script
prompt 'Enter string: '
0".prompt 'Enter an integer: '

Example Usage

   prompt 'Enter string: '                    NB. output string to session
Enter string: Hello World
Hello World
0".prompt 'Enter an integer: ' NB. output integer to session
Enter an integer: 75000
75000
mystring=: prompt 'Enter string: ' NB. store string as noun
Enter string: Hello Rosetta Code
myinteger=: 0".prompt 'Enter an integer: ' NB. store integer as noun
Enter an integer: 75000
mystring;myinteger NB. show contents of nouns
┌──────────────────┬─────┐
│Hello Rosetta Code│75000
└──────────────────┴─────┘
 

[edit] Java

 
import java.util.Scanner;
 
public class GetInput {
public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.print("Enter a string: ");
String str = s.nextLine();
System.out.print("Enter an integer: ");
int i = Integer.parseInt(s.next());
}
}

or

Works with: Java version 1.5/5.0+
import java.util.Scanner;
 
public class GetInput {
public static void main(String[] args) {
Scanner stdin = new Scanner(System.in);
String string = stdin.nextLine();
int number = stdin.nextInt();
}
}

[edit] JavaScript

Works with: JScript
and only with cscript.exe
WScript.Echo("Enter a string");
var str = WScript.StdIn.ReadLine();
 
var val = 0;
while (val != 75000) {
WScript.Echo("Enter the integer 75000");
val = parseInt( WScript.StdIn.ReadLine() );
}
Works with: SpiderMonkey
print("Enter a string");
var str = readline();
 
var val = 0;
while (val != 75000) {
print("Enter the integer 75000");
val = parseInt( readline() );
}

[edit] Joy

 
"Enter a string: " putchars
stdin fgets
"Enter a number: " putchars
stdin fgets 10 strtol.
 

[edit] Kite

 
System.file.stdout|write("Enter a String ");
string = System.file.stdin|readline();
 


[edit] Lasso

#!/usr/bin/lasso9
 
define read_input(prompt::string) => {
 
local(string)
 
// display prompt
stdout(#prompt)
// the following bits wait until the terminal gives you back a line of input
while(not #string or #string -> size == 0) => {
#string = file_stdin -> readsomebytes(1024, 1000)
}
#string -> replace(bytes('\n'), bytes(''))
 
return #string -> asstring
 
}
 
local(
string,
number
)
 
// get string
#string = read_input('Enter the string: ')
 
// get number
#number = integer(read_input('Enter the number: '))
 
// deliver the result
stdoutnl(#string + ' (' + #string -> type + ') | ' + #number + ' (' + #number -> type + ')')

Output:

Enter the string: Hello
Enter the number: 1234
Hello (string) | 1234 (integer)

[edit] Liberty BASIC

Input "Enter a string. ";string$
Input "Enter the value 75000.";num

[edit]

Logo literals may be read from a line of input from stdin as either a list or a single word.

make "input readlist   ; in: string 75000
show map "number? :input  ; [false true]
 
make "input readword  ; in: 75000
show :input + 123  ; 75123
make "input readword  ; in: string 75000
show :input  ; string 75000

[edit] Logtalk

Using an atom representation for strings and type-check failure-driven loops:

 
:- object(user_input).
 
:- public(test/0).
test :-
repeat,
write('Enter an integer: '),
read(Integer),
integer(Integer),
!,
repeat,
write('Enter an atom: '),
read(Atom),
atom(Atom),
!.
 
:- end_object.
 

Output:

 
| ?- user_input::test.
Enter an integer: 75000.
Enter an atom: 'Hello world!'.
yes
 

[edit] Lua

print('Enter a string: ')
s = io.stdin:read()
print('Enter a number: ')
i = tonumber(io.stdin:read())
 

[edit] Mathematica / Wolfram Language

mystring = InputString["give me a string please"];
myinteger = Input["give me an integer please"];

[edit] MATLAB

The input() function automatically converts the user input to the correct data type (i.e. string or double). We can force the input to be interpreted as a string by using an optional parameter 's'.

Sample usage:

>> input('Input string: ')
Input string: 'Hello'
 
ans =
 
Hello
 
>> input('Input number: ')
Input number: 75000
 
ans =
 
75000
 
>> input('Input number, the number will be stored as a string: ','s')
Input number, the number will be stored as a string: 75000
 
ans =
 
75000


[edit] Metafont

string s;
message "write a string: ";
s := readstring;
message s;
message "write a number now: ";
b := scantokens readstring;
if b = 750:
message "You've got it!"
else:
message "Sorry..."
fi;
end

If we do not provide a number in the second input, Metafont will complain. (The number 75000 was reduced to 750 since Metafont biggest number is near 4096).

[edit] Mirah

s = System.console.readLine()
 
puts s

[edit] mIRC Scripting Language

alias askmesomething {
echo -a You answered: $input(What's your name?, e)
}

[edit] Modula-3

MODULE Input EXPORTS Main;
 
IMPORT IO, Fmt;
 
VAR string: TEXT;
number: INTEGER;
 
BEGIN
IO.Put("Enter a string: ");
string := IO.GetLine();
IO.Put("Enter a number: ");
number := IO.GetInt();
IO.Put("You entered: " & string & " and " & Fmt.Int(number) & "\n");
END Input.

[edit] MUMPS

TXTINP
NEW S,N
WRITE "Enter a string: "
READ S,!
WRITE "Enter the number 75000: "
READ N,!
KILL S,N
QUIT

[edit] Nemerle

using System;
using System.Console;
 
module Input
{
Main() : void
{
Write("Enter a string:");
_ = ReadLine()
 
mutable entry = 0;
mutable numeric = false;
 
do
{
Write("Enter 75000:");
numeric = int.TryParse(ReadLine(), out entry);
} while ((!numeric) || (entry != 75000))
}
}

[edit] NetRexx

/* NetRexx */
options replace format comments java crossref symbols nobinary
 
checkVal = 75000
say 'Input a string then the number' checkVal
parse ask inString
parse ask inNumber .
 
say 'Input string:' inString
say 'Input number:' inNumber
if inNumber == checkVal then do
say 'Success! Input number is as requested'
end
else do
say 'Failure! Number' inNumber 'is not' checkVal
end
return
 

[edit] newLISP

Works with: newLISP version 9.0
(print "Enter an integer: ")
(set 'x (read-line))
(print "Enter a string: ")
(set 'y (read-line))

[edit] Objeck

 
use IO;
 
bundle Default {
class Hello {
function : Main(args : String[]) ~ Nil {
string := Console->GetInstance()->ReadString();
string->PrintLine();
 
number := Console->GetInstance()->ReadString()->ToInt();
number->PrintLine();
}
}
}
 

[edit] OCaml

print_string "Enter a string: ";
let str = read_line () in
print_string "Enter an integer: ";
let num = read_int () in
Printf.printf "%s%d\n" str num

[edit] Octave

% read a string ("s")
s = input("Enter a string: ", "s");
 
% read a GNU Octave expression, which is evaluated; e.g.
% 5/7 gives 0.71429
i = input("Enter an expression: ");
 
% parse the input for an integer
printf("Enter an integer: ");
ri = scanf("%d");
 
% show the values
disp(s);
disp(i);
disp(ri);

[edit] Oz

declare
StdIn = {New class $ from Open.file Open.text end init(name:stdin)}
StringInput
Num = {NewCell 0}
in
{System.printInfo "Enter a string: "}
StringInput = {StdIn getS($)}
 
for until:@Num == 75000 do
{System.printInfo "Enter 75000: "}
Line = {StdIn getS($)}
in
Num := try {String.toInt Line} catch _ then 0 end
end

[edit] PARI/GP

s=input();
n=eval(input());

[edit] Pascal

program UserInput(input, output);
var i : Integer;
s : String;
begin
write('Enter an integer: ');
readln(i);
write('Enter a string: ');
readln(s)
end.

[edit] Perl

Works with: Perl version 5.8.8
#!/usr/bin/perl
 
my $string = <>; # equivalent to readline(*STDIN)
my $integer = <>;

[edit] Perl 6

my $str = prompt("Enter a string: ");
my $int = prompt("Enter a integer: ");

[edit] PHP

Works with: CLI SAPI
#!/usr/bin/php
<?php
$string = fgets(STDIN);
$integer = (int) fgets(STDIN);

[edit] PicoLisp

(in NIL  # Guarantee reading from standard input
(let (Str (read) Num (read))
(prinl "The string is: \"" Str "\"")
(prinl "The number is: " Num) ) )

[edit] Pike

int main(){
write("Enter a String: ");
string str = Stdio.stdin->gets();
write("Enter 75000: ");
int num = Stdio.stdin->gets();
}

[edit] PL/I

declare s character (100) varying;
declare k fixed decimal (15);
 
put ('please type a string:');
get edit (s) (L);
put skip list (s);
 
put skip list ('please type the integer 75000');
get list (k);
put skip list (k);
put skip list ('Thanks');

[edit] Pop11

;;; Setup item reader
lvars itemrep = incharitem(charin);
lvars s, c, j = 0;
;;; read chars up to a newline and put them on the stack
while (charin() ->> c) /= `\n` do j + 1 -> j ; c endwhile;
;;; build the string
consstring(j) -> s;
;;; read the integer
lvars i = itemrep();

[edit] PostScript

Works with: PostScript version level-2
%open stdin for reading (and name the channel "kbd"):
/kbd (%stdin) (r) file def
%make ten-char buffer to read string into:
/buf (..........) def
%read string into buffer:
kbd buf readline

At this point there will be two items on the stack: a boolean which is "true" if the read was successful and the string that was read from the kbd (input terminates on a <return>). If the length of the string exceeds the buffer length, an error condition occurs (rangecheck). For the second part, the above could be followed by this:

%if the read was successful, convert the string to integer:
{cvi} if

which will read the conversion operator 'cvi' (convert to integer) and the boolean and execute the former if the latter is true.

[edit] PowerShell

$string = Read-Host "Input a string"
[int]$number = Read-Host "Input a number"

[edit] PureBasic

If OpenConsole()
; Declare a string and a integer to be used
Define txt.s, num.i
 
Print("Enter a string: ")
txt=Input()
 
Repeat
Print("Enter the number 75000: ")
num=Val(Input()) ; Converts the Input to a Value with Val()
Until num=75000
; Check that the user really gives us 75000!
 
Print("You made it!")
Delay(3000): CloseConsole()
EndIf

[edit] Python

[edit] Input a string

   string = raw_input("Input a string: ")

In Python 3.0, raw_input will be renamed to input(). The Python 3.0 equivalent would be

   string = input("Input a string: ")

[edit] Input a number

While input() gets a string in Python 3.0, in 2.x it is the equivalent of eval(raw_input(...)). Because this runs arbitrary code, and just isn't nice, it is being removed in Python 3.0. raw_input() is being changed to input() because there will be no other kind of input function in Python 3.0.

   number = input("Input a number: ")  # Deprecated, please don't use.

Python 3.0 equivalent:

   number = eval(input("Input a number: ")) # Evil, please don't use.

The preferred way of getting numbers from the user is to take the input as a string, and pass it to any one of the numeric types to create an instance of the appropriate number.

   number = float(raw_input("Input a number: "))

Python 3.0 equivalent:

   number = float(input("Input a number: "))

float may be replaced by any numeric type, such as int, complex, or decimal.Decimal. Each one varies in expected input.

[edit] R

Works with: R version 2.81
stringval <- readline("String: ")
intval <- as.integer(readline("Integer: "))

[edit] Racket

 
#lang racket
(printf "Input a string: ")
(define s (read-line))
(printf "You entered: ~a\n" s)
 
(printf "Input a number: ")
(define m (or (string->number (read-line))
(error "I said a number!")))
(printf "You entered: ~a\n" m)
 
;; alternatively, use the generic `read'
(printf "Input a number: ")
(define n (read))
(unless (number? n) (error "I said a number!"))
(printf "You entered: ~a\n" n)
 

[edit] Rascal

It is possible to use the eclipse IDE to create consoles. However, just as with the graphical input, this will always return a string. This string can subsequently be evaluated. A very simple example would be:

import util::IDE;
public void InputConsole(){
x = "";
createConsole("Input Console",
"Welcome to the Input Console\nInput\> ",
str (str inp) {x = "<inp == "75000" ? "You entered 75000" : "You entered a string">";
return "<x>\n<inp>\nInput\>";});
}

Which has as output:

Console.JPG

This makes it relatively easy to create Domain Specific Languages (or any programming language) and to create a rascal console for this. For examples with Exp, Func and Lisp, see the online Language Examples.

[edit] Raven

'Input a string: '   print expect as str
'Input an integer: ' print expect 0 prefer as num

[edit] REBOL

rebol [
Title: "Textual User Input"
Author: oofoe
Date: 2009-12-07
URL: http://rosettacode.org/wiki/User_Input_-_text
]

 
s: n: ""
 
; Because I have several things to check for, I've made a function to
; handle it. Note the question mark in the function name, this convention
; is often used in Forth to indicate test of some sort.
 
valid?: func [s n][
error? try [n: to-integer n] ; Ignore error if conversion fails.
all [0 < length? s 75000 = n]]
 
; I don't want to give up until I've gotten something useful, so I
; loop until the user enters valid data.
 
while [not valid? s n][
print "Please enter a string, and the number 75000:"
s: ask "string: "
n: ask "number: "
]
 
; It always pays to be polite...
 
print rejoin [ "Thank you. Your string was '" s "'."]

Output:

Please enter a string, and the number 75000:
string: This is a test.
number: ksldf
Please enter a string, and the number 75000:
string:
number: 75000
Please enter a string, and the number 75000:
string: Slert...
number: 75000
Thank you. Your string was 'Slert...'.

[edit] REXX

/*REXX program gets a  string  and the  number 75000  from the console. */
 
say 'Please enter a text string:' /*show prompt for a text string. */
parse pull userString /*get the user text and store it.*/
 
do until userNumber=75000 /*repeat until correct.*/
say /*display a blank line.*/
say 'Please enter the number 75000' /*show the nice prompt.*/
parse pull userNumber /*get the user text. */
end /*until*/ /*now, check if it's OK*/
/*stick a fork in it, we're done.*/

[edit] Retro

: example ( "- )
remapping off
"Enter a string: " puts 10 accept tib tempString
[ "Enter 75000: " puts getToken toNumber 75000 = cr ] until
"Your string was: '%s'\n" puts
remapping on ;

[edit] Ruby

Works with: Ruby version 1.8.4
print "Enter a string: "
s = gets
print "Enter an integer: "
i = gets.to_i # If string entered, will return zero
puts "String = #{s}"
puts "Integer = #{i}"

[edit] Scala

print("Enter a number: ")
val i=Console.readLong // Task says to enter 75000
print("Enter a string: ")
val s=Console.readLine

[edit] Scheme

The read procedure is R5RS standard, inputs a scheme representation so, in order to read a string, one must enter "hello world"

(define str (read))
(define num (read))
(display "String = ") (display str)
(display "Integer = ") (display num)

[edit] Seed7

$ include "seed7_05.s7i";
 
const proc: main is func
local
var integer: integer_input is 0;
var string: string_input is "";
begin
write("Enter an integer: ");
readln(integer_input);
write("Enter a string: ");
readln(string_input);
end func;

[edit] Slate

print: (query: 'Enter a String: ').
[| n |
n: (Integer readFrom: (query: 'Enter an Integer: ')).
(n is: Integer)
ifTrue: [print: n]
ifFalse: [inform: 'Not an integer: ' ; n printString]
] do.

[edit] Smalltalk

'Enter a number: ' display.
a := stdin nextLine asInteger.
 
'Enter a string: ' display.
b := stdin nextLine.

[edit] SNOBOL4

     output = "Enter a string:"
str = trim(input)
output = "Enter an integer:"
int = trim(input)
output = "String: " str " Integer: " int
end


[edit] Standard ML

print "Enter a string: ";
let val str = valOf (TextIO.inputLine TextIO.stdIn) in (* note: this keeps the trailing newline *)
print "Enter an integer: ";
let val num = valOf (TextIO.scanStream (Int.scan StringCvt.DEC) TextIO.stdIn) in
print (str ^ Int.toString num ^ "\n")
end
end

[edit] Tcl

Like LISP, there is no concept of a "number" in Tcl - the only real variable type is a string (whether a string might represent a number is a matter of interpretation of the string in a mathematical expression at some later time). Thus the input is the same for both tasks:

set str [gets stdin]
set num [gets stdin]

possibly followed by something like

if {![string is integer -strict $num]} then { ...do something here...}

If the requirement is to prompt until the user enters the integer 75000, then:

set input 0
while {$input != 75000} {
puts -nonewline "enter the number '75000': "
flush stdout
set input [gets stdin]
}

Of course, it's nicer to wrap the primitives in a procedure:

proc question {var message} {
upvar 1 $var v
puts -nonewline "$message: "
flush stdout
gets stdin $v
}
question name "What is your name"
question task "What is your quest"
question doom "What is the air-speed velocity of an unladen swallow"

[edit] TI-83 BASIC

This program leaves the string in String1, and the integer in variable "i".

 
 :Input "Enter a string:",Str1
 :Prompt i
 :If(i ≠ 75000): Then
 :Disp "That isn't 75000"
 :Else
 :Stop
 

[edit] TI-89 BASIC

This program leaves the requested values in the global variables s and integer.

Prgm
InputStr "Enter a string", s
Loop
Prompt integer
If integer ≠ 75000 Then
Disp "That wasn't 75000."
Else
Exit
EndIf
EndLoop
EndPrgm

[edit] Toka

needs readline
." Enter a string: " readline is-data the-string
." Enter a number: " readline >number [ ." Not a number!" drop 0 ] ifFalse is-data the-number
 
the-string type cr
the-number . cr

[edit] TUSCRIPT

 
$$ MODE TUSCRIPT
LOOP
ASK "Enter a string": str=""
ASK "Enter an integer": int=""
IF (int=='digits') THEN
PRINT "int=",int," str=",str
EXIT
ELSE
PRINT/ERROR int," is not an integer"
CYCLE
ENDIF
ENDLOOP
 

Output:

Enter a string >a
Enter an integer >a
@@@@@@@@  a is not an integer                                          @@@@@@@@
Enter a string >a
Enter an integer >1
int=1 str=a 

[edit] UNIX Shell

Works with: Bourne Shell
#!/bin/sh
 
read STRING
read INTEGER

[edit] Vedit macro language

Get_Input(1, "Enter a string: ")
#2 = Get_Num("Enter a number: ")

[edit] Visual Basic .NET

Platform: .NET

Works with: Visual Basic .NET version 9.0+

[edit] Input an Integer

Dim i As Integer
Console.WriteLine("Enter an Integer")
i = Console.ReadLine()

[edit] Input an Integer With Error Handling

Dim i As Integer
Dim iString As String
Console.WriteLine("Enter an Integer")
iString = Console.ReadLine()
Try
i = Convert.ToInt32(iString)
Catch ex As Exception
Console.WriteLine("This is not an Integer")
End Try

[edit] Input a String

Dim i As String
Console.WriteLine("Enter a String")
i = Console.ReadLine()

[edit] XPL0

When the ChIn(0) intrinsic is first called, it collects characters from the keyboard until the Enter key is struck. It then returns to the XPL0 program where one character is pulled from the buffer each time ChIn(0) is called. When the Enter key (which is the same as a carriage return, $0D) is pulled, the program quits the loop. A zero byte is stored in place of the Enter key to mark the end of the string.

string  0;              \use zero-terminated strings, instead of MSb terminated
include c:\cxpl\codes;
int I;
char Name(128); \the keyboard buffer limits input to 128 characters
 
[Text(0, "What's your name? ");
I:= 0;
loop [Name(I):= ChIn(0); \buffered keyboard input
if Name(I) = $0D\CR\ then quit; \Carriage Return = Enter key
I:= I+1;
];
Name(I):= 0; \terminate string
Text(0, "Howdy "); Text(0, Name); Text(0, "! Now please enter ^"75000^": ");
IntOut(0, IntIn(0)); CrLf(0); \echo the number
]

Example output:

What's your name? Loren Blaney
Howdy Loren Blaney! Now please enter "75000": 75000
75000

[edit] zkl

str:=ask("Gimmie a string: ");
n:=ask("Type 75000: ").toInt();

[edit] ZX Spectrum Basic

10 INPUT "Enter a string:"; s$
20 INPUT "Enter a number: "; n
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