Terminal control/Coloured text

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Task
Terminal control/Coloured text
You are encouraged to solve this task according to the task description, using any language you may know.

The task is to display a word in various colours on the terminal. The system palette, or colours such as Red, Green, Blue, Magenta, Cyan, and Yellow can be used.

Optionally demonstrate:

  • How the system should determine if the terminal supports colour
  • Setting of the background colour
  • How to cause blinking or flashing (if supported by the terminal)

Contents

[edit] AutoHotkey

AutoHotkey terminal control coloured text.jpeg

AutoHotkey is not written for the command line, so we need to use the WinAPI directly. For simplicity, this example demonstrates only the foreground colours.

DllCall( "AllocConsole" ) ; create a console if not launched from one
hConsole := DllCall( "GetStdHandle", int, STDOUT := -11 )
Loop 15
SetConsoleTextAttribute(hConsole, A_Index)
,WriteConsole(hConsole, "AutoHotkey`n")
 
MsgBox
 
SetConsoleTextAttribute(hConsole, Attributes){
return DllCall( "SetConsoleTextAttribute", UPtr, hConsole, UShort, Attributes)
}
WriteConsole(hConsole, text){
VarSetCapacity(out, 16)
If DllCall( "WriteConsole", UPtr, hConsole, Str, text, UInt, StrLen(text)
, UPtrP, out, uint, 0 )
return out
return 0
}

[edit] BASIC

QBasic colored text.png
Works with: QBasic
FOR n = 1 TO 15
COLOR n
PRINT "Rosetta Code"
NEXT

[edit] BBC BASIC

      FOR col% = 0 TO 14
COLOUR col% : REM foreground
COLOUR 128+(15-col%) : REM background
PRINT "Rosetta Code"
NEXT

Coloured text bbc.gif

[edit] C

On a terminal that understands ANSI escape sequences, such as color xterm, this shows you some annoyingly huge, annoyingly colorful tables.

#include <stdio.h>
 
void table(const char *title, const char *mode)
{
int f, b;
printf("\n\033[1m%s\033[m\n bg\t fg\n", title);
for (b = 40; b <= 107; b++) {
if (b == 48) b = 100;
printf("%3d\t\033[%s%dm", b, mode, b);
for (f = 30; f <= 97; f++) {
if (f == 38) f = 90;
printf("\033[%dm%3d ", f, f);
}
puts("\033[m");
}
}
 
int main(void)
{
int fg, bg, blink, inverse;
 
table("normal ( ESC[22m or ESC[m )", "22;");
table("bold ( ESC[1m )", "1;");
table("faint ( ESC[2m ), not well supported", "2;");
table("italic ( ESC[3m ), not well supported", "3;");
table("underline ( ESC[4m ), support varies", "4;");
table("blink ( ESC[5m )", "5;");
table("inverted ( ESC[7m )", "7;");
return 0;
}

[edit] C#

Works with: Mono version 1.2
Works with: Visual C# version 2003

Visual Studios Intellisense will list all available colours.

 
static void Main(string[] args)
{
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red;
Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Yellow;
Console.WriteLine("Red on Yellow");
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;
Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Black;
Console.WriteLine("White on black");
Console.ResetColor();
Console.WriteLine("Back to normal");
Console.ReadKey();
}
 

[edit] COBOL

Note: LOWLIGHT and BLINK are not well supported on modern terminals, and may have no effect.

Works with: OpenCOBOL
*> Apologies for the repetitiveness.
IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID. coloured-text.
 
DATA DIVISION.
WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
78 example-str VALUE "COBOL".
 
01 fore-colour PIC 9.
01 back-colour PIC 9.
 
01 line-num PIC 99 VALUE 1.
01 col-num PIC 99 VALUE 1.
 
01 pause PIC X.
 
PROCEDURE DIVISION.
PERFORM VARYING fore-colour FROM 0 BY 1 UNTIL fore-colour > 7
PERFORM VARYING back-colour FROM 0 BY 1
UNTIL back-colour > 7
DISPLAY example-str AT LINE line-num, COLUMN col-num
WITH FOREGROUND-COLOR fore-colour,
BACKGROUND-COLOR back-colour
 
ADD 6 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
ADD 1 TO line-num
MOVE 1 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
DISPLAY "With HIGHLIGHT:" AT LINE line-num, COLUMN 1
ADD 1 TO line-num
 
PERFORM VARYING fore-colour FROM 0 BY 1 UNTIL fore-colour > 7
PERFORM VARYING back-colour FROM 0 BY 1
UNTIL back-colour > 7
DISPLAY example-str AT LINE line-num, COLUMN col-num
WITH FOREGROUND-COLOR fore-colour,
BACKGROUND-COLOR back-colour HIGHLIGHT
 
ADD 6 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
ADD 1 TO line-num
MOVE 1 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
DISPLAY "With LOWLIGHT: (has no effect on many terminals)"
AT LINE line-num, COLUMN 1
ADD 1 TO line-num
 
PERFORM VARYING fore-colour FROM 0 BY 1 UNTIL fore-colour > 7
PERFORM VARYING back-colour FROM 0 BY 1
UNTIL back-colour > 7
DISPLAY example-str AT LINE line-num, COLUMN col-num
WITH FOREGROUND-COLOR fore-colour,
BACKGROUND-COLOR back-colour LOWLIGHT
 
ADD 6 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
ADD 1 TO line-num
MOVE 1 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
DISPLAY "With BLINK:" AT LINE line-num, COLUMN 1
ADD 1 TO line-num
 
PERFORM VARYING fore-colour FROM 0 BY 1 UNTIL fore-colour > 7
PERFORM VARYING back-colour FROM 0 BY 1
UNTIL back-colour > 7
DISPLAY example-str AT LINE line-num, COLUMN col-num
WITH FOREGROUND-COLOR fore-colour,
BACKGROUND-COLOR back-colour BLINK
 
ADD 6 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
ADD 1 TO line-num
MOVE 1 TO col-num
END-PERFORM
 
DISPLAY "Press enter to continue."
AT LINE line-num, COLUMN 1
ACCEPT pause AT LINE line-num, COLUMN 40
 
GOBACK
.

[edit] D

For terminals that understand color escape sequences:

import
std.conv,
std.stdio;
 
enum Color {
fgBlack = 30,
fgRed,
fgGreen,
fgYellow,
fgBlue,
fgMagenta,
fgCyan,
fgWhite,
 
bgBlack = 40,
bgRed,
bgGreen,
bgYellow,
bgBlue,
bgMagenta,
bgCyan,
bgWhite
}
 
string color(string text, Color ink) {
return "\033["
~ ink.to!int.to!string
~ "m"
~ text
~ "\033[0m";
}
 
void main() {
auto colors = [
Color.fgBlack,
Color.fgRed,
Color.fgGreen,
Color.fgYellow,
Color.fgBlue,
Color.fgMagenta,
Color.fgCyan,
Color.fgWhite
];
 
foreach (c; colors) {
// Print the color name, in white.
c.to!string.color(Color.fgWhite).writeln;
 
// Print some text in the color.
"Hello, world!".color(c).writeln;
}
}

[edit] F#

Translation of: C#
open System
 
Console.ForegroundColor <- ConsoleColor.Red
Console.BackgroundColor <- ConsoleColor.Yellow
Console.WriteLine("Red on Yellow")
 
Console.ForegroundColor <- ConsoleColor.White
Console.BackgroundColor <- ConsoleColor.Black
Console.WriteLine("White on Black")
 
Console.ForegroundColor <- ConsoleColor.Green
Console.BackgroundColor <- ConsoleColor.Blue
Console.WriteLine("Green on Blue")
 
Console.ResetColor()
Console.WriteLine("Back to normal")
Console.ReadKey()

[edit] FunL

import console.*
 
bold()
blink()
 
if $os.toLowerCase().startsWith( 'win' )
println( 'not supported' )
else
println( 'good to go' )
 
reset()
 
println( RED + 'Red', GREEN + 'Green', BLUE + 'Blue', MAGENTA + 'Magenta', CYAN + 'Cyan', YELLOW + 'Yellow' + RESET )

[edit] Go

[edit] External command

package main
 
import (
"fmt"
"os"
"os/exec"
)
 
func main() {
color(red)
fmt.Println("Red")
color(green)
fmt.Println("Green")
color(blue)
fmt.Println("Blue")
}
 
const (
blue = "1"
green = "2"
red = "4"
)
 
func color(c string) {
cmd := exec.Command("tput", "setf", c)
cmd.Stdout = os.Stdout
cmd.Run()
}

Optional tasks

package main
 
import (
"fmt"
"log"
"os"
"os/exec"
)
 
func main() {
// set background color to blue, log error message if impossible.
if err := tput("setb", blue); err != nil {
log.Fatal("no color capability")
}
// clearing the screen will fill screen with background color
// on most terminals.
tput("clear")
 
tput("blink") // set blink attribute
tput("setb", red) // new background color
fmt.Println(" Blinking Red ")
tput("sgr0") // clear blink (and all other attributes)
}
 
const (
blue = "1"
green = "2"
red = "4"
)
 
func tput(args ...string) error {
cmd := exec.Command("tput", args...)
cmd.Stdout = os.Stdout
return cmd.Run()
}

[edit] ANSI escape codes

package main
 
import "fmt"
 
func main() {
fmt.Println("\033[31mRed")
fmt.Println("\033[32mGreen")
fmt.Println("\033[34mBlue")
}

Optional tasks

package main
 
import "fmt"
 
func main() {
fmt.Print("\033[44m") // set background color
fmt.Print("\033[2J") // clear screen to paint new background color
fmt.Print("\033[5;41m") // blink on, red background
fmt.Println(" Blinking Red ")
fmt.Print("\033[25;40m") // blink off, black background
}

[edit] Ncurses

Library: Curses
package main
 
import (
"log"
 
gc "code.google.com/p/goncurses"
)
 
func main() {
s, err := gc.Init()
if err != nil {
log.Fatal("init:", err)
}
defer gc.End()
gc.StartColor()
const (
red = 1
green = 2
blue = 3
)
gc.InitPair(red, gc.C_RED, gc.C_BLACK)
gc.InitPair(green, gc.C_GREEN, gc.C_BLACK)
gc.InitPair(blue, gc.C_BLUE, gc.C_BLACK)
s.ColorOn(red)
s.Println("Red")
s.ColorOn(green)
s.Println("Green")
s.ColorOn(blue)
s.Println("Blue")
s.GetChar()
}

Optional tasks

package main
 
import (
"log"
 
gc "code.google.com/p/goncurses"
)
 
func main() {
s, err := gc.Init()
if err != nil {
log.Fatal("init:", err)
}
defer gc.End()
// determine color support
if !gc.HasColors() {
log.Fatal("no color support")
}
// set background color
gc.StartColor()
gc.InitPair(1, gc.C_WHITE, gc.C_BLUE)
s.ColorOn(1)
s.SetBackground(gc.Char(' ') | gc.ColorPair(1))
// blinking, different background color
s.AttrOn(gc.A_BLINK)
gc.InitPair(2, gc.C_WHITE, gc.C_RED)
s.ColorOn(2)
s.Print(" Blinking Red ")
s.GetChar()
}

[edit] Haskell

Library: ansi-terminal
Works with: GHC version 7.4.1
Works with: ansi-terminal version 0.5.5.1
#!/usr/bin/runhaskell
 
import System.Console.ANSI
 
colorStrLn :: ColorIntensity -> Color -> ColorIntensity -> Color -> String -> IO ()
colorStrLn fgi fg bgi bg str = do
setSGR [SetColor Foreground fgi fg, SetColor Background bgi bg]
putStr str
setSGR []
putStrLn ""
 
main = do
colorStrLn Vivid White Vivid Red "This is red on white."
colorStrLn Vivid White Dull Blue "This is white on blue."
colorStrLn Vivid Green Dull Black "This is green on black."
colorStrLn Vivid Yellow Dull Black "This is yellow on black."
colorStrLn Dull Black Vivid Blue "This is black on light blue."

[edit] J

Quite different from the fixed c solution, we flexibly construct character vectors that combine various functions. This code constructs two such sequences, DB is useful to write vertical text, and the noun J output to the terminal draws to the extent of my artistic ability the J icon at the relative position.

NB. relies on an vt100 terminal
 
CSI=: 27 91 { a.
'BLACK BLUE CYAN WHITE'=: 0 4 6 7
'OFF REVERSEVIDEO'=: 0 7
 
HIDECURSOR=: CSI,'?25l'
SHOWCURSOR=: CSI,'?25h'
 
csi=: (,~ (CSI , (' '&=)`(,:&';')}@:":))~
clear=: csi&'J'
attributes=: csi&'m'
color=: BLACK&$: : (attributes@:(40 30 + ,)) NB. BACKGROUND color FOREGROUND
move=: csi&'H'
 
upward=: csi&'A'
downward=: csi&'B'
foreward=: csi&'C'
backward=: csi&'D'
 
DB=: (downward , backward) ''
 
NB. J is character vector to simulate the J icon.
J=: (BLUE color WHITE[CYAN)
J=: J , (backward 1),' T ',(backward 1),DB,,3#,:'|',DB
J=: J , (backward 5),'* |',DB
J=: J , (backward 5),'\____/'
smoutput(color BLACK),(clear 2),(move 8 22),J,(WHITE color BLACK),(downward 2)
 


[edit] Lasso

#!/usr/bin/lasso9
 
define ec(code::string) => {
 
local(esc = decode_base64('Gw=='))
local(codes = map('esc' = #esc,
'normal' = #esc + '[0m',
'blink' = #esc + '[5;31;49m',
'red' = #esc + '[31;49m',
'blue' = #esc + '[34;49m',
'green' = #esc + '[32;49m',
'magenta' = #esc + '[35;49m',
'yellowred' = #esc + '[33;41m'
))
 
return #codes -> find(#code)
}
 
stdout( ec('red'))
stdoutnl('So this is the Rosetta Code!')
stdout( ec('blue'))
stdoutnl('So this is the Rosetta Code!')
stdout( ec('green'))
stdoutnl('So this is the Rosetta Code!')
stdout( ec('magenta'))
stdoutnl('So this is the Rosetta Code!')
stdout( ec('yellowred'))
stdout('So this is the Rosetta Code!')
stdoutnl( ec('blink'))
stdoutnl('So this is the Rosetta Code!')
stdout( ec('normal'))
 

[edit] Locomotive Basic

10 mode 1:defint a-z
20 print "Mode 1 (4 colors):"
30 for y=0 to 3
40 for x=0 to 3
50 pen x:paper y:print "Test";
60 next
70 print
80 next
90 pen 1:paper 0
100 locate 1,25:print "<Press any key>";:call &bb06
110 ink 1,8,26
120 ink 2,21,17
130 locate 1,25:print "Flashing inks --- <Press any key>";:call &bb06
140 speed ink 8,3
150 locate 1,25:print "Different flashing --- <Press any key>";:call &bb06
160 ink 1,24:ink 2,20 ' back to defaults -- see chapter 1, page 50 in CPC manual
170 pen 1:paper 0:mode 0:speed ink 50,50
180 print "Mode 0 (16 colors):"
190 for i=0 to 15
200 pen i
210 if i=0 then paper 1 else paper 0
220 print using "##";i;
230 for j=1 to 18
240 print chr$(143);
250 next
260 next
270 pen 1:paper 0
280 print "Paper/pen 14 and 15"
290 print "are set to";
300 pen 14:print " flashing":pen 1
310 print "by default."
320 print
330 print "*End of color demo*"
340 locate 1,25:print "<Press any key>";:call &bb06
350 mode 1

[edit] Mathematica

Delegating to tput on terminal enabled OS(Mac Os, Linux)

Run["tput setaf 1"]; Print["Coloured Text"]; 
Run["tput setaf 2"]; Print["Coloured Text"];
Run["tput setaf 3"]; Print["Coloured Text"]

Colouredtextmma.png

[edit] Nimrod

import Terminal
setForegroundColor(fgRed)
echo "FATAL ERROR! Cannot write to /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-33-generic"
 
setBackgroundColor(bgBlue)
setForegroundColor(fgYellow)
stdout.write "This is an "
writeStyled "important"
stdout.write " word"
resetAttributes()
stdout.write "\n"
 
setForegroundColor(fgYellow)
echo "RosettaCode!"
 
setForegroundColor(fgCyan)
echo "RosettaCode!"
 
setForegroundColor(fgGreen)
echo "RosettaCode!"
 
setForegroundColor(fgMagenta)
echo "RosettaCode!"

[edit] OCaml

Using the library ANSITerminal in the interactive loop:

$ ocaml unix.cma -I +ANSITerminal ANSITerminal.cma
 
# open ANSITerminal ;;
# print_string [cyan; on_blue] "Hello\n" ;;
Hello
- : unit = ()


[edit] ooRexx

This program is based on the shell script in the Bash Prompt HowTo at http://www.tldp.org/, by Giles Orr. It uses object-oriented features of Open Object Rexx.

 
#!/usr/bin/rexx
/*.----------------------------------------------------------------------.*/
/*|bashcolours: Display a table showing all of the possible colours that |*/
/*| can be generated using ANSI escapes in bash in an xterm |*/
/*| terminal session. |*/
/*| |*/
/*|Usage: |*/
/*| |*/
/*|>>-bashcolours-.----------.-----------------------------------------><|*/
/*| |-- -? ----| |*/
/*| |-- -h ----| |*/
/*| '- --help -' |*/
/*| |*/
/*|where |*/
/*| -?, -h or --help |*/
/*| display this documentation. |*/
/*| |*/
/*|This program is based on the shell script in the Bash Prompt HowTo at |*/
/*|http://www.tldp.org/, by Giles Orr. |*/
/*| |*/
/*|This program writes the various colour codes to the terminal to |*/
/*|demonstrate what's available. Each line showshe colour code of one |*/
/*|forground colour, out of 17 (default + 16 escapes), followed by a test|*/
/*|use of that colour on all nine background colours (default + 8 |*/
/*|escapes). Additional highlighting escapes are also demonstrated. |*/
/*| |*/
/*|This program uses object-oriented features of Open Object Rexx. |*/
/*|The lineout method is used instead of say for consistency with use of |*/
/*|the charout method. |*/
/*'----------------------------------------------------------------------'*/
call usage arg(1)
trace normal
 
/* See if escapes work on the kind of terminal in use. */
if value('TERM',,'ENVIRONMENT') = 'LINUX' then
do
say 'The Linux console does not support ANSI escape sequences for',
'changing text colours or highlighting.'
exit 4
end
 
/* Set up the escape sequences. */
 ! = '1B'x -- ASCII escape
bg = .array~of('[40m','[41m','[42m','[43m','[44m','[45m','[46m','[47m')
fg = .array~of('[0m', '[1m', '[0;30m','[1;30m','[0;31m','[1;31m',,
'[0;32m','[1;32m','[0;33m','[1;33m','[0;34m','[1;34m',,
'[0;35m','[1;35m','[0;36m','[1;36m','[0;37m','[1;37m')
hi = .array~of('[4m','[5m','[7m','[8m')
text = 'gYw' -- The test text
.OUTPUT~lineout(' ')
.OUTPUT~lineout('Foreground | Background Codes')
.OUTPUT~lineout(!'[4mCodes '!'[0m|'||,
 !'[4m~[40m ~[41m ~[42m ~[43m ~[44m ~[45m ~[46m ~[47m'!'[0m')
 
do f = 1 to fg~size -- write the foreground info.
prefix = '~'fg[f]~left(6)' '!||fg[f]~strip' 'text
.OUTPUT~charout(prefix)
 
do b = 1 to bg~size -- write the background info.
segment = !||fg[f]~strip !||bg[b]' 'text' '!||fg[1]
.OUTPUT~charout(segment)
end
 
.OUTPUT~lineout(' ')
end
 
/* Write the various highlighting escape sequences. */
prefix = '~[4m'~left(6)' '!||hi[1]'Underlined'!||fg[1]
.OUTPUT~lineout(prefix)
prefix = '~[5m'~left(6)' '!||hi[2]'Blinking'!||fg[1]
.OUTPUT~lineout(prefix)
prefix = '~[7m'~left(6)' '!||hi[3]'Inverted'!||fg[1]
.OUTPUT~lineout(prefix)
prefix = '~[8m'~left(6)' '!||hi[4]'Concealed'!||fg[1],
"(Doesn't seem to work in my xterm; might in Windows?)"
.OUTPUT~lineout(prefix)
.OUTPUT~lineout(' ')
.OUTPUT~lineout("Where ~ denotes the ASCII escape character ('1B'x).")
.OUTPUT~lineout(' ')
exit
 
/*.--------------------------------------------------------.*/
/*|One might expect to be able to use directory collections|*/
/*|as below instead of array collections, but there is no |*/
/*|way to guarantee that a directory's indices will be |*/
/*|iterated over in a consistent sequence, since directory |*/
/*|objects are not ordered. Oh, well... |*/
/*'--------------------------------------------------------'*/
fg = .directory~new
fg[Default] = '[0m'; fg[DefaultBold] = '[1m'
fg[Black] = '[0;30m'; fg[DarkGray] = '[1;30m'
fg[Blue] = '[0;34m'; fg[LightBlue] = '[1;34m'
fg[Green] = '[0;32m'; fg[LightGreen] = '[1;32m'
fg[Cyan] = '[0;36m'; fg[LightCyan] = '[1;36m'
fg[Red] = '[0;31m'; fg[LightRed] = '[1;31m'
fg[Purple] = '[0;35m'; fg[LightPurple] = '[1;35m'
fg[Brown] = '[0;33m'; fg[Yellow] = '[1;33m'
fg[LightGray] = '[0;37m'; fg[White] = '[1;37m'
bg = .directory~new; hi = .directory~new
bg[Black] = '[0;40m'; hi[Underlined] = '[4m'
bg[Blue] = '[0;44m'; hi[Blinking] = '[5m'
bg[Green] = '[0;42m'; hi[Inverted] = '[7m'
bg[Cyan] = '[0;46m'; hi[Concealed] = '[8m'
bg[Red] = '[0;41m'
bg[Purple] = '[0;45m'
bg[Brown] = '[0;43m'
bg[LightGray] = '[0;47m'
 
usage: procedure
trace normal
 
if arg(1) = '-h',
| arg(1) = '-?',
| arg(1) = '--help'
then
do
line = '/*|'
say
 
do l = 3 by 1 while line~left(3) = '/*|'
line = sourceline(l)
parse var line . '/*|' text '|*/' .
.OUTPUT~lineout(text)
end
 
say
exit 0
end
return
 

This is what the output looks like:

BashColours.png

--Leslie 23:10, 23 September 2012 (UTC)

[edit] Perl 6

use Term::ANSIColor;
 
say colored('RED ON WHITE', 'bold red on_white');
say colored('GREEN', 'bold green');
say colored('BLUE ON YELLOW', 'bold blue on_yellow');
say colored('MAGENTA', 'bold magenta');
say colored('CYAN ON RED', 'bold cyan on_red');
say colored('YELLOW', 'bold yellow');

[edit] PicoLisp

Translation of: UNIX Shell
(unless (member (sys "TERM") '("linux" "xterm" "xterm-color" "rxvt"))
(quit "This application requires a colour terminal") )
 
# Coloured text
(for X '((1 . "Red") (4 . "Blue") (3 . "Yellow"))
(call 'tput "setaf" (car X))
(prinl (cdr X)) )
 
# Blinking
(out '(tput "-S")
(prinl "setab 1^Jsetaf 3^Jblink") )
(prin "Flashing text")
 
(call 'tput 'sgr0) # reset
(prinl)

[edit] Python

Library: colorama
 
from colorama import init, Fore, Back, Style
init(autoreset=True)
 
print Fore.RED + "FATAL ERROR! Cannot write to /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-33-generic"
print Back.BLUE + Fore.YELLOW + "What a cute console!"
print "This is an %simportant%s word" % (Style.BRIGHT, Style.NORMAL)
print Fore.YELLOW + "Rosetta Code!"
print Fore.CYAN + "Rosetta Code!"
print Fore.GREEN + "Rosetta Code!"
print Fore.MAGENTA + "Rosetta Code!"
print Back.YELLOW + Fore.BLUE + Style.BRIGHT + " " * 40 + " == Good Bye!"
 


This is a windows only solution without colorama

 
from ctypes import *
 
windll.Kernel32.GetStdHandle.restype = c_ulong
h = windll.Kernel32.GetStdHandle(c_ulong(0xfffffff5))
#Default CMD colour = 7
def color(colour):
windll.Kernel32.SetConsoleTextAttribute(h, colour)
 
for count in range (0, 16):
color(count)
print "This Colour Is #" + str(count)
 
print ""
color(7)
raw_input("holding cmd")
 

[edit] PureBasic

If OpenConsole()
PrintN("Background color# 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15")
PrintN(" -----------------------------------------------")
Define Foreground, Background
For Foreground = 0 To 15
ConsoleColor(7, 0) ;grey foreground, black background
Print("Foreground color# " + RSet(Str(Foreground), 2, "0") + " ")
For Background = 0 To 15
ConsoleColor(Foreground, Background)
Print(RSet(Str(Foreground), 2, "0"))
ConsoleColor(7, 0) ;grey foreground, black background
Print(" ")
Next
PrintN("")
Next
 
ConsoleColor(7, 0) ;grey foreground, black background
Print(#CRLF$ + #CRLF$ + "Press ENTER to exit"): Input()
CloseConsole()
EndIf

Terminal control,colored text.png

[edit] Racket

Translation of: Tcl
 
#lang racket
 
;; Utility interfaces to the low-level command
(define (capability? cap) (system (~a "tput "cap" > /dev/null 2>&1")))
(define (tput . xs) (system (apply ~a 'tput " " (add-between xs " "))) (void))
(define (colorterm?) (and (capability? 'setaf) (capability? 'setab)))
(define color-map '([black 0] [red 1] [green 2] [yellow 3]
[blue 4] [magenta 5] [cyan 6] [white 7]))
(define (foreground color) (tput 'setaf (cadr (assq color color-map))))
(define (background color) (tput 'setab (cadr (assq color color-map))))
(define (reset) (tput 'sgr0) (void))
 
;; Demonstration of use
(if (colorterm?)
(begin (foreground 'blue)
(background 'yellow)
(displayln "Color output")
(reset))
(displayln "Monochrome only"))
(if (capability? 'blink)
(begin (tput 'blink)
(displayln "Blinking output")
(reset))
(displayln "Steady only"))
 

[edit] REXX

[edit] PC/REXX or Personal REXX

REXX terminal control coloured text.JPG

This REXX program only works under PC/REXX (also called Personal REXX).
PC/REXX can execute under MSDOS (or a Windows DOS window), or OS/2.
Only Windows older than Windows 7 supports RC/REXX, newer versions of Windows won't run 16-bit code.

The prologue code (at the bottom of the program) is a collection of some general-purpose subroutines which determine:

  • which environment (operating system) the REXX interpreter is running under
  • if Windows/NT/XP/Vista/7/8 (the NT family) is running
  • which REXX is being executed
  • what literal to use to obtain the environmental variables (for the value bif)
  • what the fileName, fileType/fileExt, fileMode/path is of the REXX program
  • which command to use to clear the terminal screen
  • invokes $H to show general documentation (1st and only arg = ?)
  • invokes $H to show a flow diagram (1st and only arg = ?FLOW)
  • invokes $H to show sample uses (1st and only arg = ?SAMPLE)
  • invokes $H to show the author & contact info (1st and only arg = ?AUTHOR)

All the prologue was left intact to give a general feel of the scope of the boilerplate code.
The prologue code is in many REXX programs and it's easier to keep them on one line for copying purposes and sorting.

The program displays 16 lines, each of a different color with text stating the color of the text.
(The black text, of course, is essentially invisible as the background is also black.)

/*REXX program to display sixteen lines,  each of a different color.    */
parse arg !; if !all() then exit /*exit if documentation specified*/
if \!dos & \!os2 then exit /*if this isn't DOS, then exit. */
if \!pcrexx then exit /*if this isn't PC/REXX, exit. */
 
color.0 = 'black' /*┌─────────────────────────────┐*/
color.1 = 'dark blue' /*│ Normally, all programs issue│*/
color.2 = 'dark green' /*│ the (above) error messages │*/
color.3 = 'dark cyan/turquois' /*│ through another REXX program│*/
color.4 = 'dark red' /*│ ($ERR) which has more │*/
color.5 = 'dark pink/magenta' /*│ verbage and explanations, │*/
color.6 = 'dark yellow (orange)' /*│ and issues the error text in│*/
color.7 = 'dark white' /*│ red (if color is available).│*/
color.8 = 'brite black (grey/gray)' /*└─────────────────────────────┘*/
color.9 = 'bright blue'
color.10 = 'bright green'
color.11 = 'bright cyan/turquois'
color.12 = 'bright red'
color.13 = 'bright pink/magenta'
color.14 = 'bright yellow'
color.15 = 'bright white'
 
do j=0 to 15 /*show all sixteen color codes. */
call scrwrite ,,'color code=['right(j,2)"]" color.j,,,j; say
end /*j*/ /*the "SAY" forces a NEWLINE. */
exit /*stick a fork in it, we're done.*/
/*══════════════════════════════════general 1-line subs═════════════════*/
!all:!!=!;!=space(!);upper !;call !fid;!nt=right(!var('OS'),2)=='NT';!cls=word('CLS VMFCLEAR CLRSCREEN',1+!cms+!tso*2);if arg(1)\==1 then return 0;if wordpos(!,'? ?SAMPLES ?AUTHOR ?FLOW')==0 then return 0;!call=']$H';call '$H' !fn !;!call=;return 1
!cal:if symbol('!CALL')\=="VAR" then !call=;return !call
!env:!env='ENVIRONMENT';if !sys=='MSDOS'|!brexx|!r4|!roo then !env='SYSTEM';if !os2 then !env='OS2'!env;!ebcdic=1=='f0'x;return
!fid:parse upper source !sys !fun !fid . 1 . . !fn !ft !fm .;call !sys;if !dos then do;_=lastpos('\',!fn);!fm=left(!fn,_);!fn=substr(!fn,_+1);parse var !fn !fn '.' !ft;end;return word(0 !fn !ft !fm,1+('0'arg(1)))
!rex:parse upper version !ver !vernum !verdate .;!brexx='BY'==!vernum;!kexx='KEXX'==!ver;!pcrexx='REXX/PERSONAL'==!ver|'REXX/PC'==!ver;!r4='REXX-R4'==!ver;!regina='REXX-REGINA'==left(!ver,11);!roo='REXX-ROO'==!ver;call !env;return
!sys:!cms=!sys=='CMS';!os2=!sys=='OS2';!tso=!sys=='TSO'|!sys=='MVS';!vse=!sys=='VSE';!dos=pos('DOS',!sys)\==0|pos('WIN',!sys)\==0|!sys=='CMD';call !rex;return
!var:call !fid;if !kexx then return space(dosenv(arg(1)));return space(value(arg(1),,!env))

[edit] Ruby

Library: colored
#!/usr/bin/ruby -w
require 'rubygems'
require 'colored'
 
print 'Colors are'.bold
print ' black'.black
print ' blue'.blue
print ' cyan'.cyan
print ' green'.green
print ' magenta'.magenta
print ' red'.red
print ' white '.white
print 'and'.underline, ' yellow'.yellow, "\n"
puts 'black on blue'.black_on_blue
puts 'black on cyan'.black_on_cyan
puts 'black on green'.black_on_green
puts 'black on magenta'.black_on_magenta
puts 'black on red'.black_on_red
puts 'white on black'.white_on_black
puts 'white on blue'.white_on_blue
puts 'white on cyan'.white_on_cyan
puts 'white on green'.white_on_green
puts 'white on magenta'.white_on_magenta
puts 'white on red'.white_on_red

Colored-text-ruby.png

[edit] Tcl

This only works on Unix terminals as it delegates to the system tput command.

# Utility interfaces to the low-level command
proc capability cap {expr {![catch {exec tput -S << $cap}]}}
proc colorterm {} {expr {[capability setaf] && [capability setab]}}
proc tput args {exec tput -S << $args >/dev/tty}
array set color {black 0 red 1 green 2 yellow 3 blue 4 magenta 5 cyan 6 white 7}
proc foreground x {exec tput -S << "setaf $::color($x)" > /dev/tty}
proc background x {exec tput -S << "setab $::color($x)" > /dev/tty}
proc reset {} {exec tput sgr0 > /dev/tty}
 
# Demonstration of use
if {[colorterm]} {
foreground blue
background yellow
puts "Color output"
reset
} else {
puts "Monochrome only"
}
 
if {[capability blink]} {
tput blink
puts "Blinking output"
reset
} else {
puts "Steady only"
}

[edit] TPP

--color red
This is red
--color green
This is green
--color blue
This is blue
--color cyan
This is cyan
--color magenta
This is magenta
--color yellow
This is yellow

[edit] UNIX Shell

#!/bin/sh
# Check if the terminal supports colour
 
# We should know from the TERM evironment variable whether the system
# is comfigured for a colour terminal or not, but we can also check the
# tput utility to check the terminal capability records.
 
COLORS=8 # Assume initially that the system supports eight colours
case $TERM in
linux)
 ;; # We know this is a colour terminal
rxvt)
 ;; # We know this is a colour terminal
*)
COLORS=`tput colors 2> /dev/null` # Get the number of colours from the termcap file
esac
if [ -z $COLORS ] ; then
COLORS=1 # Watch out for an empty returned value
fi
 
if [ $COLORS -le 2 ] ; then
# The terminal is not colour
echo "HW65000 This application requires a colour terminal" >&2
exit 252 #ERLHW incompatible hardware
fi
 
# We know at this point that the terminal is colour
 
# Coloured text
tput setaf 1 #red
echo "Red"
tput setaf 4 #blue
echo "Blue"
tput setaf 3 # yellow
echo "Yellow"
 
# Blinking
tput setab 1 # red background
tput setaf 3 # yellow foreground
#tput blink # enable blinking (but does not work on some terminals)
echo "Flashing text"
 
tput sgr0 # reset everything before exiting

[edit] XPL0

Device 6 is similar to the standard console output device 0, but it supports color. When light colors are used for background (in a text rather than graphic display mode) they are displayed as standard (dim) colors and the foreground color flashes. A BIOS call (int 10h, func 10h, sub 03h) can be used to disable flashing and enable bright backgrounds.

It's possible to detect monochrome displays with a BIOS call, but monochrome is so ancient it's not worth demonstrating. Actually the older 16-bit versions of the language made it easy to detect monochrome using the Equip(ment) intrinsic, but the newer 32-bit version doesn't provide the Equip intrinsic.

Of course these features are provided by the hardware of IBM-compatible PCs and by simulators, such as DOSBox, on other computers.

code ChOut=8, Attrib=69;
def Black, Blue, Green, Cyan, Red, Magenta, Brown, White, \attribute colors
Gray, LBlue, LGreen, LCyan, LRed, LMagenta, Yellow, BWhite; \EGA palette
[ChOut(6,^C); \default white on black background
Attrib(Red<<4+White); \white on red
ChOut(6,^o);
Attrib(Green<<4+Red); \red on green
ChOut(6,^l);
Attrib(Blue<<4+LGreen); \light green on blue
ChOut(6,^o);
Attrib(LRed<<4+White); \flashing white on (standard/dim) red
ChOut(6,^u);
Attrib(Cyan<<4+Black); \black on cyan
ChOut(6,^r);
]

[edit] ZX Spectrum Basic

The ZX Spectrum will always output colour. However if the television is black and white, these will show as various levels of luminence corresponding to the numerical colour value.

10 FOR l=0 TO 7
20 READ c$: REM get our text for display
30 INK l: REM set the text colour
40 PRINT c$
50 NEXT l
60 PAPER 2: REM red background
70 INK 6: REM yellow forground
80 FLASH 1: REM activate flashing
90 PRINT "Flashing!": REM this will flash red and yellow (alternating inverse)
100 PAPER 7: INK 0: FLASH 0: REM normalize colours before exit
110 STOP
 
900 DATA "Black","Blue","Red","Magenta","Green","Cyan","Yellow","White"
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