Example:Hough transform/C

From Rosetta Code

==This is a programming example for the Hough transform programming task. If the task description is not listed here, refer back to that page. ==

Translation of: Tcl

(Tested only with the pentagon image given)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>
 
#include <cairo.h>
 
#ifndef M_PI
#define M_PI 3.1415927
#endif
 
#define GR(X,Y) (d[(*s)*(Y)+bpp*(X)+((2)%bpp)])
#define GG(X,Y) (d[(*s)*(Y)+bpp*(X)+((1)%bpp)])
#define GB(X,Y) (d[(*s)*(Y)+bpp*(X)+((0)%bpp)])
#define SR(X,Y) (ht[4*tw*((Y)%th)+4*((X)%tw)+2])
#define SG(X,Y) (ht[4*tw*((Y)%th)+4*((X)%tw)+1])
#define SB(X,Y) (ht[4*tw*((Y)%th)+4*((X)%tw)+0])
#define RAD(A) (M_PI*((double)(A))/180.0)
uint8_t *houghtransform(uint8_t *d, int *w, int *h, int *s, int bpp)
{
int rho, theta, y, x, W = *w, H = *h;
int th = sqrt(W*W + H*H)/2.0;
int tw = 360;
uint8_t *ht = malloc(th*tw*4);
memset(ht, 0, 4*th*tw); // black bg
 
for(rho = 0; rho < th; rho++)
{
for(theta = 0; theta < tw/*720*/; theta++)
{
double C = cos(RAD(theta));
double S = sin(RAD(theta));
uint32_t totalred = 0;
uint32_t totalgreen = 0;
uint32_t totalblue = 0;
uint32_t totalpix = 0;
if ( theta < 45 || (theta > 135 && theta < 225) || theta > 315) {
for(y = 0; y < H; y++) {
double dx = W/2.0 + (rho - (H/2.0-y)*S)/C;
if ( dx < 0 || dx >= W ) continue;
x = floor(dx+.5);
if (x == W) continue;
totalpix++;
totalred += GR(x, y);
totalgreen += GG(x, y);
totalblue += GB(x, y);
}
} else {
for(x = 0; x < W; x++) {
double dy = H/2.0 - (rho - (x - W/2.0)*C)/S;
if ( dy < 0 || dy >= H ) continue;
y = floor(dy+.5);
if (y == H) continue;
totalpix++;
totalred += GR(x, y);
totalgreen += GG(x, y);
totalblue += GB(x, y);
}
}
if ( totalpix > 0 ) {
double dp = totalpix;
SR(theta, rho) = (int)(totalred/dp) &0xff;
SG(theta, rho) = (int)(totalgreen/dp) &0xff;
SB(theta, rho) = (int)(totalblue/dp) &0xff;
}
}
}
 
*h = th; // sqrt(W*W+H*H)/2
*w = tw; // 360
*s = 4*tw;
return ht;
}
 
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
cairo_surface_t *inputimg = NULL;
cairo_surface_t *houghimg = NULL;
 
uint8_t *houghdata = NULL, *inputdata = NULL;
int w, h, s, bpp;
 
if ( argc < 3 ) return EXIT_FAILURE;
 
inputimg = cairo_image_surface_create_from_png(argv[1]);
 
w = cairo_image_surface_get_width(inputimg);
h = cairo_image_surface_get_height(inputimg);
s = cairo_image_surface_get_stride(inputimg);
bpp = cairo_image_surface_get_format(inputimg);
switch(bpp)
{
case CAIRO_FORMAT_ARGB32: bpp = 4; break;
case CAIRO_FORMAT_RGB24: bpp = 3; break;
case CAIRO_FORMAT_A8: bpp = 1; break;
default:
fprintf(stderr, "unsupported\n");
goto destroy;
}
 
inputdata = cairo_image_surface_get_data(inputimg);
houghdata = houghtransform(inputdata, &w, &h, &s, bpp);
 
printf("w=%d, h=%d\n", w, h);
houghimg = cairo_image_surface_create_for_data(houghdata,
CAIRO_FORMAT_RGB24,
w, h, s);
cairo_surface_write_to_png(houghimg, argv[2]);
 
destroy:
if (inputimg != NULL) cairo_surface_destroy(inputimg);
if (houghimg != NULL) cairo_surface_destroy(houghimg);
 
return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Output image (but with white background):

Output image when input is the given Pentagon.


Alternative version[edit]

Penta-hugh.png
Hugh-lines-in.png
Hugh-lines-out.png

This code is a little to long to my liking, because I had to put some ad hoc stuff that should be better served by libraries. But you don't want to see libpng code here, trust me.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <err.h>
#include <math.h>
 
/* start of utility functions: not interesting */
typedef unsigned char uchar;
typedef unsigned long ulong;
typedef struct intensity_t {
double **pix;
long width, height;
} *intensity;
 
double PI;
 
#define decl_array_alloc(type) \
type ** type##_array(long w, long h) { \
int i; \
type ** row = malloc(sizeof(type*) * h); \
type * pix = malloc(sizeof(type) * h * w); \
for (i = 0; i < h; i++) \
row[i] = pix + w * i; \
memset(pix, 0, sizeof(type) * h * w); \
return row; \
}

 
decl_array_alloc(double);
decl_array_alloc(ulong);
 
intensity intensity_alloc(long w, long h)
{
intensity x = malloc(sizeof(struct intensity_t));
x->width = w;
x->height = h;
x->pix = double_array(w, h);
 
return x;
}
 
long get_num(uchar **p, uchar *buf_end)
{
uchar *ptr = *p, *tok_end;
long tok;
while (1) {
while (ptr < buf_end && isspace(*ptr)) ptr++;
if (ptr >= buf_end) return 0;
 
if (*ptr == '#') { /* ignore comment */
while (ptr++ < buf_end) {
if (*ptr == '\n' || *ptr == '\r') break;
}
continue;
}
 
tok = strtol((char*)ptr, (char**)&tok_end, 10);
if (tok_end == ptr) return 0;
*p = tok_end;
return tok;
}
return 0;
}
 
/* Note: not robust. A robust version would be to long for example code */
intensity read_pnm(char *name)
{
struct stat st;
uchar *fbuf, *ptr, *end;
long width, height, max_val;
int i, j;
intensity ret;
 
int fd = open(name, O_RDONLY);
if (fd == -1) err(1, "Can't open %s", name);
 
/* from now on assume all operations succeed */
fstat(fd, &st);
fbuf = malloc(st.st_size + 1);
read(fd, fbuf, st.st_size);
*(end = fbuf + st.st_size) = '\0';
close(fd);
 
if (fbuf[0] != 'P' || (fbuf[1] != '5' && fbuf[1] != '6') || !isspace(fbuf[2]))
err(1, "%s: bad format: can only do P5 or P6 pnm", name);
 
ptr = fbuf + 3;
width = get_num(&ptr, end);
height = get_num(&ptr, end);
max_val = get_num(&ptr, end);
if (max_val <= 0 || max_val >= 256)
err(1, "Can't handle pixel value %ld\n", max_val);
 
fprintf(stderr, "[Info] format: P%c w: %ld h: %ld value: %ld\n",
fbuf[1], width, height, max_val);
 
ret = intensity_alloc(width, height);
ptr ++; /* ptr should be pointint at the first pixel byte now */
 
if (fbuf[1] == '5') { /* graymap, 1 byte per pixel */
for (i = 0; i < height; i++) {
for (j = 0; j < width; j++) {
ret->pix[i][j] = (double)*(ptr++) / max_val;
}
}
} else { /* pnm, 1 byte each for RGB */
/* hocus pocus way of getting lightness from RGB for us */
for (i = 0; i < height; i++) {
for (j = 0; j < width; j++) {
ret->pix[i][j] = (ptr[0] * 0.2126 +
ptr[1] * 0.7152 +
ptr[2] * 0.0722) / max_val;
ptr += 3;
}
}
}
 
free(fbuf);
return ret;
}
 
void write_pgm(double **pix, long w, long h)
{
long i, j;
unsigned char *ptr, *buf = malloc(sizeof(double) * w * h);
char header[1024];
sprintf(header, "P5\n%ld %ld\n255\n", w, h);
 
ptr = buf;
for (i = 0; i < h; i++)
for (j = 0; j < w; j++)
*(ptr++) = 256 * pix[i][j];
 
write(fileno(stdout), header, strlen(header));
write(fileno(stdout), buf, w * h);
 
free(buf);
}
 
/* Finally, end of util functions. All that for this function. */
intensity hugh_transform(intensity in, double gamma)
{
long i, j, k, l, m, w, h;
double bg, r_res, t_res, rho, r, theta, x, y, v, max_val, min_val, *pp;
intensity graph;
 
/* before anything else, legalize Pi = 3 */
PI = atan2(1, 1) * 4;
 
/* first, run through all pixels and see what the average is,
* so we can take a guess if the background is black or white.
* a real application wouldn't do silly things like this */

for (i = 0, bg = 0; i < in->height; i++)
for (j = 0; j < in->width; j++)
bg += in->pix[i][j];
fprintf(stderr, "[info] background is %f\n", bg);
bg = (bg /= (in->height * in->width) > 0.5) ? 1 : 0;
 
/* if white, invert it */
if (bg) {
for (i = 0; i < in->height; i++)
for (j = 0; j < in->width; j++)
in->pix[i][j] = 1 - in->pix[i][j];
}
 
/* second, decide what resolution of rho and theta should be.
* here we just make the rho/theta graph a fixed ratio
* of input, which is dumb. It should depend on the application.
* finer bins allow better resolution between lines, but will
* lose contrast if the input is noisy. Also, lower resolution, faster.
*/

# define RRATIO 1.5
# define TRATIO 1.5
x = in->width - .5;
y = in->height - .5;
r = sqrt(x * x + y * y) / 2;
 
w = in->width / TRATIO;
h = in->height / RRATIO;
r_res = r / h;
t_res = PI * 2 / w;
 
graph = intensity_alloc(w, h);
 
for (i = 0; i < in->height; i++) {
y = i - in->height / 2. + .5;
for (j = 0; j < in->width; j++) {
x = j - in->width / 2 + .5;
r = sqrt(x * x + y * y);
v = in->pix[i][j];
 
/* hackery: sample image is mostly blank, this saves a great
* deal of time. Doesn't help a lot with noisy images */

if (!v) continue;
 
/* at each pixel, check what lines it could be on */
for (k = 0; k < w; k++) {
theta = k * t_res - PI;
rho = x * cos(theta) + y * sin(theta);
if (rho >= 0) {
m = rho / r_res;
l = k;
} else {
m = -rho / r_res;
l = (k + w/2.);
l %= w;
}
graph->pix[m][l] += v * r;
}
}
/* show which row we are precessing lest user gets bored */
fprintf(stderr, "\r%ld", i);
}
fprintf(stderr, "\n");
 
max_val = 0;
min_val = 1e100;
pp = &(graph->pix[graph->height - 1][graph->width - 1]);
for (i = graph->height * graph->width - 1; i >= 0; i--, pp--) {
if (max_val < *pp) max_val = *pp;
if (min_val > *pp) min_val = *pp;
}
 
/* gamma correction. if gamma > 1, output contrast is better, noise
is suppressed, but spots for thin lines may be lost; if gamma < 1,
everything is brighter, both lines and noises */

pp = &(graph->pix[graph->height - 1][graph->width - 1]);
for (i = graph->height * graph->width - 1; i >= 0; i--, pp--) {
*pp = pow((*pp - min_val)/ (max_val - min_val), gamma);
}
 
return graph;
}
 
int main()
{
//intensity in = read_pnm("pent.pnm");
intensity in = read_pnm("lines.pnm");
intensity out = hugh_transform(in, 1.5);
 
/* binary output goes straight to stdout, get ready to see garbage on your
* screen if you are not careful!
*/

write_pgm(out->pix, out->width, out->height);
 
/* not going to free memory we used: OS can deal with it */
return 0;
}

This program takes a pnm file (binary, either P5 or P6) and does the transformation, then dump output onto stdout. Sample images below are output from the pentagram; sample lines with added noise; output of processing that. Both output were with 1.5 gamma.